acanthopterygian love

acanthopterygian

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of a large group of fishes of the superorder Acanthopterygii, having bony skeletons and spiny rays in the dorsal and anal fins and including the bass, perch, mackerel, and swordfish.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Belonging to the order of fishes having spinose fins, as the perch.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to the Acanthopterygii; having the characters of the Acanthopterygii.
  • n. One of the Acanthopterygii; a fish with spiny fins.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a teleost fish with fins that are supported by sharp inflexible rays

Etymologies

From New Latin Acanthopterygiī, superorder name : acantho- + Greek pterux, pterug-, wing, fin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From New Latin, from acanthus ("thorn"), (from Ancient Greek ἄκανθος) + Ancient Greek πτερυγίων (pterugion) diminutive of πτέρυξ (pterux, "wing, fin"), from πτερόν ("feather, wing"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The acanthopterygian family (_Labyrinthici_) contains nine freshwater genera, and these are distributed between the East Indies and South and

    On the Genesis of Species

  • If you speak of an acanthopterygian, it is plain that you are not discussing perch in reference to its roasting or boiling merits; and if you make an allusion to monomyarian malacology, it will not naturally be supposed to have reference to the cooking of oyster sauce.

    The Book-Hunter A New Edition, with a Memoir of the Author

  • Ay, there must be something strangely entrancing in dragging the shoal waters with a hand-line, for unsuspicious, easily duped members of the acanthopterygian tribe of fishes, -- under which alarming denomination come, I believe, nearly all the finny fellows to be met with on these sand-banks, from the bluefish to the burgall.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 07, No. 40, February, 1861

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