Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun plural Any two places or regions that are on diametrically opposite sides of the earth.
  • noun plural Something that is the exact opposite or contrary of another; an antipode.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Persons living at diametrically opposite points of the globe, so that their feet are directed toward each other; persons who live on the side of the globe opposite to others.
  • Two places on the surface of the globe diametrically opposite to each other; the country or region on the opposite side of the globe.
  • Figuratively, things opposed to each other: as a singular, anything diametrically adverse or opposed to another thing belonging to the same general order; a contrary. In the latter sense sometimes used in the singular form antipode (which see).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Those who live on the side of the globe diametrically opposite.
  • noun The country of those who live on the opposite side of the globe.
  • noun Anything exactly opposite or contrary.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any two places or regions that are on diametrically opposite sides of the earth
  • noun The southern hemisphere
  • noun Used in UK to refer to Australia and New Zealand - (once common, now less so)
  • noun figuratively, by extension The opposite of something

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any two places or regions on diametrically opposite sides of the Earth

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, people with feet opposite ours, from Latin, from Greek, from pl. of antipous, with the feet opposite : anti-, anti- + pous, pod-, foot; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek ἀντίποδες (antipodes), plural of ἀντίπους (antipous), from ἀντί (anti, "opposite") + πούς (pous, "foot").

Examples

  • Like Borochov, Lieberman is a Russian-speaking Jew and a committed Zionist, but his vision of peace and stability is at antipodes from the one Borochov set forth in 1917.

    "Israel Is Our Home"

  • Like Borochov, Lieberman is a Russian-speaking Jew and a committed Zionist, but his vision of peace and stability is at antipodes from the one Borochov set forth in 1917.

    "Israel Is Our Home"

  • Like Borochov, Lieberman is a Russian-speaking Jew and a committed Zionist, but his vision of peace and stability is at antipodes from the one Borochov set forth in 1917.

    "Israel Is Our Home"

  • Like Borochov, Lieberman is a Russian-speaking Jew and a committed Zionist, but his vision of peace and stability is at antipodes from the one Borochov set forth in 1917.

    "Israel Is Our Home"

  • This artful separation of what was actually perfectly consistent behavior into bogus antipodes is why My Life's therapeutic grid is pure scaffolding, about as meaningful as the little backdrop mantras (for example, "Strong American Communities") that Clinton's White House made a staple of presidential speeches.

    Policy Wank

  • This artful separation of what was actually perfectly consistent behavior into bogus antipodes is why My Life's therapeutic grid is pure scaffolding, about as meaningful as the little backdrop mantras (for example, "Strong American Communities") that Clinton's White House made a staple of presidential speeches.

    Policy Wank

  • There was, however, considerable tension over any idea that the lands on the opposite ends of the earth otherwise known as antipodes could be inhabited by people.

    Christians With Closed Hearts And Minds

  • Accordingly, St. Augustine treats the idea of antipodes as an absurdity; and Lactantius, whom we have already quoted, expressly says “can there possibly be any persons so simple as to believe that there are men whose heads are lower than their feet?” etc.St. Chrysostom exclaims, in his fourteenth homily, “Where are they who pretend that the heavens are movable, and that their form is circular?”

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • How at the antipodes was the picture he was seeing!

    The Man from the Bitter Roots

  • Mr. Newton took me everywhere, even to the little seventeenth-century Swedish church, which architecturally may be described as the antipodes of Philadelphia's newer glory, the Curtis

    Roving East and Roving West

Comments

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  • "arse end of the world"

    October 6, 2007