Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Having the qualities of a good companion; friendly. synonym: social.
  • adjective Suggestive of or conducive to companionship.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Fitted for good-fellowship; qualified or inclined to be agreeable in company; sociable.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Fitted to be a companion; fit for good fellowship; agreeable; sociable.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Having the characteristics of a worthy companion; friendly and sociable.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective suggestive of companionship

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We sat in what I suppose was called companionable silence.

    As Husbands Go

  • They walked along in companionable silence for a while when suddenly the Doctor blurted out, “You want a ring, Rose?”

    Update

  • We sat in what I suppose was called companionable silence.

    As Husbands Go

  • They ate together in companionable silence until it was almost time to go.

    The Good Unicorn « A Fly in Amber

  • Anyone who feels like meeting me there -- just to work in companionable silence with tasty snacks, not to chat -- come on by.

    November 21st, 2003

  • And it’s true: Sitting with others, even in companionable silence, at our own humble, artisanal feast of creation is healing me.

    Archive 2009-11-01

  • And it’s true: Sitting with others, even in companionable silence, at our own humble, artisanal feast of creation is healing me.

    Pensée du lundi 23 novembre

  • They instantly fall into certain companionable roles: the smartest one lends an educated perspective on a topic, the most outrageous one cracks the kind of jokes she wouldn’t dare to if a man were around, the least intellectually secure one feels safe enough to ask the most rudimentary questions.

    The Uses of Enchantment

  • They instantly fall into certain companionable roles: the smartest one lends an educated perspective on a topic, the most outrageous one cracks the kind of jokes she wouldn’t dare to if a man were around, the least intellectually secure one feels safe enough to ask the most rudimentary questions.

    The Uses of Enchantment

  • Although perhaps it is more important for a poet to be "companionable" than to dilly-dally around so much with words and stuff, more important to offer "something born of blood and emotion" (as if Stevens's poems don't contain emotion -- has Wiman read "The Death of a Soldier"?) than to write skillful and provocative poems.

    Poetry

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