Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Seeking and enjoying the company of others; sociable. synonym: social.
  • adjective Tending to move in or form a group with others of the same kind.
  • adjective Botany Growing in groups that are close together but not densely clustered or matted.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Disposed to live in flocks or herds; inclined to gather in companies; not preferring solitude or restricted companionship: as, cattle and sheep are gregarious animals; men are naturally gregarious.
  • In botany, growing in open clusters, not matted together.
  • By Drude and subsequent writers gregarious plants are further determined as growing in patches among other vegetation, thus contrasting with social species, which dominate the whole ground.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Habitually living or moving in flocks or herds; tending to flock or herd together; not habitually solitary or living alone.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective of a person Describing one who enjoys being in crowds and socializing.
  • adjective zoology Of animals that travel in herds or packs.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective instinctively or temperamentally seeking and enjoying the company of others
  • adjective (of plants) growing in groups that are close together
  • adjective (of animals) tending to form a group with others of the same species

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin gregārius, belonging to a flock, from grex, greg-, flock; see ger- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin gregārius.

Examples

  • Kebron was the mortal enemy of the term "gregarious," likely to try and eliminate it from any dictionary in any language.

    Fire on High

  • Kebron was the mortal enemy of the term "gregarious," likely to try and eliminate it from any dictionary in any language.

    Fire on High

  • Kebron was the mortal enemy of the term "gregarious," likely to try and eliminate it from any dictionary in any language.

    Fire on High

  • But public opinion, because of the tremendous urge to conformity in gregarious animals, is less tolerant than any system of law '.

    Spilling the Beans in Paris and London

  • But public opinion, because of the tremendous urge to conformity in gregarious animals, is less tolerant than any system of law.

    Politics vs. Literature: An Examination of Gulliver’s Travels

  • His son, whom he described as a gregarious comic, was trying to support his 2-year-old daughter Aniyah, who lives with the West family and is being raised by her grandparents.

    Fore, right!

  • But during the last two years of the Bush administration, Bolton's successor, Afghan-born Zalmay Khalilzad, became known as a gregarious and affable diplomat who improved relations somewhat.

    HeraldNet.com Local, Sports, Business and Entertainment News

  • On the one hand the novel is that friendly old beast, the late Victorian realist novel in English - gregarious, self-aware, pompous.

    Eve's Alexandria

  • Garrigus - his name might as well be "gregarious" - was thankful, too, despite a tough way to lose.

    The Seattle Times

  • Garrigus - his name might as well be "gregarious" - was thankful, too, despite a tough way to lose.

    The Seattle Times

Comments

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  • Sociable an enjoying the company of others

    July 8, 2014

  • to be likely to socialize with others

    Often we think that great leaders are those who are gregarious, always in the middle of a large group of people; yet, as Mahatma Gandhi and many others have shown us, leaders can also be introverted.

    October 11, 2016