Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Seeking and enjoying the company of others; sociable. See Synonyms at social.
  • adj. Tending to move in or form a group with others of the same kind: gregarious bird species.
  • adj. Botany Growing in groups that are close together but not densely clustered or matted.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Describing one who enjoys being in crowds and socializing.
  • adj. Of animals that travel in herds or packs.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Habitually living or moving in flocks or herds; tending to flock or herd together; not habitually solitary or living alone.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Disposed to live in flocks or herds; inclined to gather in companies; not preferring solitude or restricted companionship: as, cattle and sheep are gregarious animals; men are naturally gregarious.
  • In botany, growing in open clusters, not matted together.
  • By Drude and subsequent writers gregarious plants are further determined as growing in patches among other vegetation, thus contrasting with social species, which dominate the whole ground.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. instinctively or temperamentally seeking and enjoying the company of others
  • adj. (of plants) growing in groups that are close together
  • adj. (of animals) tending to form a group with others of the same species

Etymologies

Latin gregārius, belonging to a flock, from grex, greg-, flock; see ger- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin gregārius. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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