Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A type of wheat (Triticum dicoccum or T. dicoccon syn. T. turgidum subsp. dicoccum or dicoccon) typically having two seeds per spikelet, first cultivated in the Neolithic period and widely grown in the Middle East and Europe through the Bronze Age. It is now grown in parts of Eurasia and Africa.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A species of wheat, Triticum dicoccum; amel-corn.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun a hard red wheat (Triticum dicoccum) grown especially in Russia and Germany; also grown in the U. S. as stock feed.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A species of wheat, Triticum dicoccum.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun hard red wheat grown especially in Russia and Germany; in United States as stock feed

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[German, from Middle High German amer, emeri, from Old High German amaro.]

Examples

  • It is a kind of wheat and it is also sometimes called emmer.

    The Skinnygirl Dish

  • Farro, also known as emmer, is higher in fiber than common wheat with a wonderful chewy and hearty texture.

    You Raising Your Child

  • Farro, also known as emmer, is higher in fiber than common wheat with a wonderful chewy and hearty texture.

    You Raising Your Child

  • Farro, also known as emmer, is higher in fiber than common wheat with a wonderful chewy and hearty texture.

    You Raising Your Child

  • It is a kind of wheat and it is also sometimes called emmer.

    The Skinnygirl Dish

  • Farro, also known as emmer, is higher in fiber than common wheat with a wonderful chewy and hearty texture.

    You Raising Your Child

  • I toast emmer aka farro before cooking it into pilaf; adds even more nuttiness to an already nutty grain.

    Toasting It

  • Farro type of wheat, also called emmer has become one of my favorite grains over the last year and is great in so many dishes.

    Archive 2008-04-01

  • Farro type of wheat, also called emmer has become one of my favorite grains over the last year and is great in so many dishes.

    Tuna Toast

  • Prehistoric people would have gazed upon herds of gazelle and other wild animals; gently flowing rivers, which attracted migrating geese and ducks; fruit and nut trees; and rippling fields of wild barley and wild wheat varieties such as emmer and einkorn.

    Gobekli Tepi

Comments

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  • "Since June 2009, wheat, buckwheat, and rye flours have been on sale at their Greenmarket stalls, as well as corn meals, polentas, and whole grains such as emmer, barley, and oats—all grown upstate."

    "Breadwinners" by Indrani Sen, in Edible Brooklyn No. 19, Fall 2010, p 43

    November 26, 2010

  • "The earliest cultivated wheats were known as emmer and einkorn, both with tough ears that held on so tightly to their grain that they had to be toasted to loosen them; barley was also sown, though rye and oats appeared only as weeds among the crops. Once parched, the ears were threshed, winnowed and pounded to a rough flour using the ancient saddle quern, a bow-shaped stone with a rolling-pin-shaped grinder. The effort was enormous, and the bread, cooked on hot stones, was so gritty and dry that teeth were universally worn to stubs. In fact, early cereals were so gluten-light that they were far more effectively cooked in porridges."

    --Kate Colquhoun, <i>Taste: The Story of Britain Through Its Cooking</i> (NY: Bloomsbury, 2007), 8-9

    January 6, 2017