Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Unwisely bold or venturesome; rash. synonym: reckless.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Bold without judgment or moderation; foolishly rash and venturesome.
  • Synonyms Adventurous, Enterprising, Rash, etc. (see adventurous); hot-headed, hare-brained. See rash.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Daring without judgment; foolishly adventurous and bold.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Marked by unthinking recklessness with disregard for danger; bold but rash; hotheaded

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective marked by defiant disregard for danger or consequences

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English folhardi, from Old French fol hardi : fol, fool; see fool + hardi, bold; see hardy.]

Examples

  • Perhaps the only thing more foolhardy is expecting to diminish interest in a game by publicly protesting it.

    Zulu 1 Tactical Airsoft Simulation Puts Folly in Play

  • His experiment with the kite was the best in foolhardy empirical research.

    Behe: ID rescues Common Descent

  • He wrote "a poem of the world," fell in love with an actress older than himself, became known as foolhardy for his wild escapades, and only slowly sobered down.

    Youth: Its Education, Regimen, and Hygiene

  • He thought doing so would be "foolhardy" - until the second or third season, he said, when he realized he'd have the chance to end the series on his own terms.

    Michael Smerconish: Mr. Monk and the End

  • He thought doing so would be "foolhardy" - until the second or third season, he said, when he realized he'd have the chance to end the series on his own terms.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • It was pleasant to have won her way so far in high places that her health of body and mind should be thus considered — pleasant, less as personal gratification, than that it casually reflected a proof of her good judgment in a course which everybody among her kindred had condemned by calling a foolhardy undertaking.

    The Hand of Ethelberta

  • But whatever risk there might be, or how strong my faith when my patrons were the subjects of what might be called foolhardy experiments, there came a time when this faith was to have the severest of all tests.

    The No Breakfast Plan and the Fasting-Cure

  • This might almost be called foolhardy, inasmuch as when he arrived at Mainz, on April seventeenth, he knew little or nothing of the enemy's position, force, or plans.

    The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte Vol. III. (of IV.)

  • It was pleasant to have won her way so far in high places that her health of body and mind should be thus considered -- pleasant, less as personal gratification, than that it casually reflected a proof of her good judgment in a course which everybody among her kindred had condemned by calling a foolhardy undertaking.

    The Hand of Ethelberta

  • And in a move that could be described as foolhardy or inspired, she has stayed faithful to the original material.

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

Comments

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  • but you won't fool Laurel.

    May 10, 2008

  • fool-hahr-dee

    –adjective, -di·er, -di·est. recklessly or thoughtlessly bold; foolishly rash or venturesome.

    September 22, 2008