Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The institutions, precepts, and rites of the Freemasons.
  • noun Spontaneous fellowship and sympathy among a number of people.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The principles, practices, and institutions of freemasons.
  • noun Hence Secret or tacit brotherhood.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The institutions or the practices of freemasons.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Fellowship and sympathy among a number of people
  • noun Strange customs which resemble Freemasons.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun Freemasons collectively
  • noun a natural or instinctive fellowship between people of similar interests

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • i think freemasonry is much more dangerous « Niqnaq

    i think freemasonry is much more dangerous

  • The really bad party system is that in which a man is caught so tightly and becomes so deeply involved in party loyalty, or what may be called the freemasonry side of politics, that he grows into feeling a kind of moral obligation to stick to his party, right or wrong.

    The Adventure of Living

  • It was my initiation into what I have termed the freemasonry of the race.

    The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

  • The really bad party system is that in which a man is caught so tightly and becomes so deeply involved in party loyalty, or what may be called the freemasonry side of politics, that he grows into feeling a kind of moral obligation to stick to his party, right or wrong.

    The Adventure of Living : a Subjective Autobiography

  • Here a tall gentleman marched up to him, and addressed him in a certain language, which might be called the freemasonry of flash, and which Paul, though he did not comprehend

    Paul Clifford — Volume 02

  • Here a tall gentleman marched up to him, and addressed him in a certain language, which might be called the freemasonry of flash, and which Paul, though he did not comprehend verbatim, rightly understood to be an inquiry whether he was a thorough rogue and an entire rascal.

    Paul Clifford — Complete

  • Capturing Kabul through proxy war in 1997 while a ragtag freemasonry of Mujahideen was defending Kabul was one thing.

    Bloggers.Pakistan

  • Jim is a friend from childhood—they “grew up together in the same Nebraska town,” sharing a “kind of freemasonry”—and is now the legal counsel for a railroad company.

    The meaning of patriotism

  • His profession furnished me with some hope that this desired communication might be attained; since it is well known that, in Scotland, where there is so much national music, the words and airs of which are generally known, there is a kind of freemasonry amongst performers, by which they can, by the mere choice of a tune, express a great deal to the hearers.

    Redgauntlet

  • The secret is well kept, doubtless by a kind of freemasonry amongst bearded men, but there can be little doubt that somewhere there are nurseries where a _bonâ-fide_ beard-grower who is in the secret can retire until he is presentable.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 156, April 30, 1919

Comments

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  • history book, page 325

    October 5, 2010