Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A store selling foodstuffs and various household supplies.
  • n. Commodities sold by a grocer.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Usually groceries; retail foodstuffs and other household supplies.
  • n. A shop or store that sells groceries; a grocery store.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The commodities sold by grocers, as tea, coffee, spices, etc.; -- in the United States almost always in the plural form, in this sense.
  • n. A retail grocer's shop or store.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The selling of or dealing in goods at wholesale; wholesale traffic.
  • n. Goods sold at wholesale, collectively.
  • n. General supplies for the table and for household use, as flour, sugar, spices, coffee, etc.; the commodities sold by grocers: now always in the plural.
  • n. A grocer's shop.
  • n. A drinkingshop.
  • n. Small money; halfpence and farthings.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a marketplace where groceries are sold
  • n. (usually plural) consumer goods sold by a grocer

Etymologies

From French grosserie ("wholesale"). Compare gross. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • *grins*

    December 23, 2011

  • Haha!!!

    December 23, 2011

  • Get it? Gross?

    *sigh*

    December 22, 2011

  • Thank you, frog. Saying it the other way is just gross.

    December 22, 2011

  • I say: I walked to the grosh-ree store to buy some grosh-reez.

    December 22, 2011

  • Having said that, I almost never watch TV. Or, for that matter, spend time "on the street".

    December 22, 2011

  • I share rolig's astonishment; I've never once noticed the "sh" pronunciation. If it's so widespread you'd think I'd have heard it on TV, if not on the street.

    December 21, 2011

  • A friend of mine who grew up in southern NJ says "gross-er-ee." In Nebraska, I say "grosh-ree."

    December 21, 2011

  • This is astonishing. I was born and grew up in Baltimore, where I lived for some 30-odd years, and I never noticed that anyone said "groshery".

    December 21, 2011

  • See this map for American pronunciation.

    April 11, 2008