Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The act or an instance of enjoining; a command, directive, or order.
  • noun Law A court order requiring a party to refrain from doing a particular act or to do a particular act.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of enjoining or directing; admonition as to action or duty; requirement.
  • noun That which is enjoined; a command, order, or admonition.
  • noun An obligation; engagement; imposition.
  • noun In law, a judicial process or order requiring the person to whom it is directed to do or to refrain from doing a particular thing.
  • noun Conjunction; union.
  • noun An injunction granted to continue pending the action, as distinguished from one merely temporary, or until opposition can be heard.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of enjoining; the act of directing, commanding, or prohibiting.
  • noun That which is enjoined; an order; a mandate; a decree; a command; a precept; a direction.
  • noun (Law) A writ or process, granted by a court of equity, and, in some cases, under statutes, by a court of law, whereby a party is required to do or to refrain from doing certain acts, according to the exigency of the writ.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of enjoining; the act of directing, commanding, or prohibiting.
  • noun That which is enjoined; an order; a mandate; a decree; a command; a precept; a direction.
  • noun law A writ or process, granted by a court of equity, and, in some cases, under statutes, by a court of law, whereby a party is required to do or to refrain from doing certain acts, according to the exigency of the writ.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (law) a judicial remedy issued in order to prohibit a party from doing or continuing to do a certain activity
  • noun a formal command or admonition

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English injunccion, from Late Latin iniūnctiō, iniūnctiōn-, from Latin iniūnctus, past participle of iniungere, to enjoin : in-, in; see in– + iungere, to join; see yeug- in Indo-European roots.]

Examples

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