Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Relating to or being a will that is delivered orally to witnesses rather than written.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Pertaining to naming, nominating, vowing, or dedicating.
  • In the law of wills, oral; not written; made or declared by word of mouth.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective obsolete Publicly or solemnly declaratory.
  • adjective obsolete Nominal; existing only in name.
  • adjective Oral; not written.
  • adjective a will or testament made by word of mouth only, before witnesses, as by a soldier or seaman, and depending on oral testimony for proof.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Oral; not written.
  • adjective obsolete Publicly or solemnly declaratory.
  • adjective obsolete Nominal; existing only in name.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Medieval Latin nūncupātīvus, from Late Latin, so-called, from Latin nūncupātus, past participle of nūncupāre, to name : nōmen, name; see nŏ̄-men- in Indo-European roots + capere, to take; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin nuncupātīvus ("nominal").

Examples

Comments

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  • a way to say "oral, not written" without saying "oral." also (obs.): nominal, existing only in name; publicly or solemnly declaratory.

    July 26, 2008

  • The old man despised daughter Beth

    So left her bereft at his death,

    And even nuncupative

    His will was vituperative,

    To wound her with his dying breath.

    November 21, 2017