Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The extent or range of activity, function, power, or competence; scope. synonym: range.
  • noun Range of vision.
  • noun Range of understanding or experience.
  • noun The body or main part of a statute, as distinguished from its preamble.
  • noun The general scope and coverage of a statute.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A condition, provision, or disposition; in law, that part of a statute which begins with the words “Be it enacted,” as distinguished from the preamble, and hence the whole body of provisions.
  • noun Field, scope, sphere, or limits of anything, as of a law, authority, etc.: as, the purview of science; facts that come under the purview of consciousness.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Law) The body of a statute, or that part which begins with “ Be it enacted, ” as distinguished from the preamble.
  • noun The limit or scope of a statute; the whole extent of its intention or provisions.
  • noun Limit or sphere of authority; scope; extent.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun law The enacting part of a statute.
  • noun law The scope of a statute.
  • noun Scope or range of interest or control.
  • noun Range of understanding.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the range of interest or activity that can be anticipated

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Alteration (influenced by view) of Middle English purveu, proviso, from Anglo-Norman purveu est, it is provided (from the use of this word to introduce a proviso), past participle of purveier, to provide; see purvey.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English purveu ("proviso"), from Anglo-Norman purveuest ("it is provided"), or purveu que ("provided that") (statutory language), from Old French porveu ("provided"), past partiple of porveoir ("to provide"), from Latin provideo (See provide). Influenced by view and its etymological antecedants.

Examples

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    Economics

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    Politics

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    Accountability

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    ~synthesis~

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    Transparency

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    Geopolitics

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    all for one...

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    all for one...

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    Creativity

  • Not only are there overlaps in purview, but the physical portfolios are so intertwined that changes in one have ripple effects on others, and most critically the citizens.

    7 posts from May 2010

Comments

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  • "'Twenty-four hours,' he said. 'He's booked on Iberia's morning flight at seven-twenty. He's a repatriation case. They're under the purview of the ministry.'"

    - 'The Quiet Girl', Peter Høeg.

    March 19, 2008