Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Law An obligation of record that is entered into before a court or magistrate, containing a condition to perform a particular act, such as making a court appearance.
  • n. Law A sum of money pledged to assure the performance of such an act.
  • n. A recognition.
  • n. Archaic A pledge; a token.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a form of bail; a promise made by the accused to the court that he/she will attend all required judicial proceedings and will not engage in further illegal activity or other prohibited conduct as set by the court.
  • n. A token; a symbol; a pledge.
  • n. acknowledgment of a person or thing; avowal; profession; recognition

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.
  • n. An obligation of record entered into before some court of record or magistrate duly authorized, with condition to do some particular act, as to appear at the same or some other court, to keep the peace, or pay a debt. A recognizance differs from a bond, being witnessed by the record only, and not by the party's seal.
  • n. The verdict of a jury impaneled upon assize.
  • n. A token; a symbol; a pledge; a badge.
  • n. Acknowledgment of a person or thing; avowal; profession; recognition.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of recognizing; acknowledgment of a person or thing; avowal; recognition.
  • n. Mark or badge of recognition; token.
  • n. In law:
  • n. An obligation of record entered into before some court of record or magistrate duly authorized, conditioned to do some particular act, as to appear at court, to keep the peace, or pay a debt.
  • n. The verdict of a jury impaneled upon assize.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (law) a security entered into before a court with a condition to perform some act required by law; on failure to perform that act a sum is forfeited

Etymologies

Middle English recognisanze, from Old French recognuissance, alteration (influenced by Medieval Latin recognizāre, to recognize) of reconoissance, from reconoistre, reconoiss-, to recognize; see recognize.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
recognize +‎ -ance (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • When was the last time you used the word recognizance in casual conversation?

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  • "recognizance" is one of those words that always looks wrong.

    Jean Gris isn't worried about your guns.

  • A recognizance is a set of conditions they must adhere to while out on surety.

    Yahoo! Answers: Latest Questions

  • Hall was released on her own recognizance, meaning she promised to appear in court and answer a criminal charge.

    Bridget Hall Arrested For Driving While Intoxicated

  • The supermodel was pulled over at 3: 17 a.m. on August 29 in East Hampton, New York, and allegedly released on her own recognizance, meaning she promised to appear in court and answer a criminal charge.

    Bridget Hall Contesting Drunk Driving Arrest

  • Arlington Detective Crystal L. Nosal Abuelazam said police realized he was wanted on a simple assault warrant in Leesburg, about 30 miles away, but a magistrate released him on personal recognizance, meaning he was responsible for returning to court.

    www2.timesdispatch.com - News

  • She says after booking him, a magistrate denied Abuelazam bond, and released him the same day on personal recognizance, meaning he would be responsible for returning to court.

    WMDT Top News Stories

  • Arlington Detective Crystal L. Nosal said police realized he was wanted on a simple assault warrant in Leesburg, about 30 miles away, but a magistrate released him on personal recognizance, meaning he was responsible for returning to court.

    ajc.com - News

  • Crystal L. Nosal said police realized he was wanted on a simple assault warrant in him on personal recognizance, meaning he was responsible for returning to court.

    www2.timesdispatch.com - News

  • Arlington Detective Crystal Nosal said police realized he was wanted on a simple assault warrant in Leesburg, about 30 miles away, but a magistrate released him on personal recognizance, meaning Abuelazam was responsible for returning to court.

    USATODAY.com News - Top Stories

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