Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A British soldier, especially one serving during the American Revolution.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A British soldier, especially during the American Revolution.
  • n. A member of the entertainment staff at Butlins holiday camps in the United Kingdom, who wear red blazers
  • n. a fox

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who wears a red coat; specifically, a red-coated British soldier.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A British soldier.
  • n. The bedbug.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. British soldier; so-called because of his red coat (especially during the American Revolution)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Faced with the chance to become the voice of a generation, Blacc seems to have opted instead to be a singing Butlins redcoat.

    Aloe Blacc – review

  • Still, the brigadier thought they had potential under the right leadership, as redcoat privates were notorious for being the same sort of material.

    George Washington’s First War

  • Washington and several others thought most redcoat casualties came from their own fire.18

    George Washington’s First War

  • The privates of the two redcoat regiments were “entirely at a loss in the woods,” Adam Stephen wrote.

    George Washington’s First War

  • One redcoat remembered that about 200 of them plunged into the woods and fought from behind trees “and I belive they did the moast execution of any.”

    George Washington’s First War

  • Despite their differences and occasional arguments, Washington had a great deal of fondness for the irascible old redcoat, who had shown him unusual warmth in return.

    George Washington’s First War

  • “On the other side of the river most of us halted to consider what to do,” one redcoat remembered, “but the men being so terrified desired to go on . . . expecting every moment to have our retreat cut off.”

    George Washington’s First War

  • Still, the attitude of the other young officers influenced him, and he felt the first inklings that maybe this redcoat army was not the elite corps it was cracked up to be.

    George Washington’s First War

  • The measure also allowed relief for redcoat deserters who returned voluntarily.

    George Washington’s First War

  • Indian probably Shawnee scalping a redcoat, print of an eighteenth-century painting by an unknown artist, possibly a British soldier.

    George Washington’s First War

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