Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Salt.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A large gregarious tree, Shorea robusta, natural order Dipterocarpeæ, of northern India.
  • noun Salt: a word much used by the older chemists and in pharmacy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) An East Indian timber tree (Shorea robusta), much used for building purposes. It is of a light brown color, close-grained, heavy, and durable.
  • noun (Chem. & Pharm.) Salt.
  • noun (Old Chem.) an impure potassium carbonate obtained from the ashes of wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium).
  • noun (Old Chem.) salt of sorrel.
  • noun (Old Chem.) See Alembroth.
  • noun (Chem.) ammonium chloride, NH4Cl, a white crystalline volatile substance having a sharp salty taste, obtained from gas works, from nitrogenous matter, etc. It is largely employed as a source of ammonia, as a reagent, and as an expectorant in bronchitis. So called because originally made from the soot from camel's dung at the temple of Jupiter Ammon in Africa. Called also muriate of ammonia.
  • noun (Old Med. Chem.) Epsom salts.
  • noun (Old Chem.) common salt, or sodium chloride.
  • noun (Old Chem.) See Sal ammoniac above.
  • noun (Old Chem.) potassium sulphate; -- so called because erroneously supposed to be composed of two salts, one acid and one alkaline.
  • noun (Old Med. Chem.) potassium acetate.
  • noun (Old Chem.) acid potassium sulphate.
  • noun (Old Min.) common salt occuring native.
  • noun (Old Chem.) salt tin, or stannic chloride; -- the alchemical name of tin being Jove.
  • noun (Old Chem.) green vitriol, or ferrous sulphate; -- the alchemical name of iron being Mars.
  • noun (Old Chem.) See Microcosmic salt, under Microcosmic.
  • noun (Old Chem.) sugar of lead.
  • noun (Old Chem.) See Prunella salt, under 1st Prunella.
  • noun (Old Chem.) sugar of lead, or lead acetate; -- the alchemical name of lead being Saturn.
  • noun (Old Chem.) sedative salt, or boric acid.
  • noun (Chem.) Rochelle salt.
  • noun (Chem.) sodium carbonate. See under Sodium.
  • noun (Old Chem.) white vitriol; zinc sulphate.
  • noun (Chem.) Spirits of ammonia.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Shorea robusta, a dipterocarpaceous tree.
  • noun chemistry, obsolete salt

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin sāl; see sal- in Indo-European roots.]

Examples

  • Second Book rendering _salis avarus_ by _de sal avariento_ -- the second person singular of the present indicative of the verb _salire_ being mistaken for the genitive of the substantive _sal_ [271] -- we may perhaps conclude that a boyish exercise has somehow escaped destruction.

    Fray Luis de León A Biographical Fragment

  • Our word "salary" comes from the Latin word sal meaning salt!

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  • The soldier comes from the Latin word sal dare (to give salt).

    ENagar

  • My god my blood ran cold. scary that blueberry sal is being used to support white supremacy. my whole childhood just flinched.

    Reading for Young Sheep

  • Boric acid was first prepared by Wilhelm Homberg (1652-1715) from borax, by the action of mineral acids, and was given the name sal sedativum Hombergi ( "sedative salt of Homberg") [1] Boric acid and its sodium borate salts are active ingredients of pesticide products used against insects, spiders, mites, algae, molds, fungi, and weeds.

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • Boric acid was first prepared by Wilhelm Homberg (1652-1715) from borax, by the action of mineral acids, and was given the name sal sedativum Hombergi ( "sedative salt of Homberg") [1] Boric acid and its sodium borate salts are active ingredients of pesticide products used against insects, spiders, mites, algae, molds, fungi, and weeds.

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • At the time, the compound was given the name sal sedativum Hombergi, meaning "sedative salt of Homberg."

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • The Latin word sal is the root for the English word salary.

    Halite

  • The common method for the manufacture of ammonia is to produce it from the salt known as sal-ammoniac.

    Scientific American Supplement No. 819, September 12, 1891

  • M.M. Salt of urine, called sal microcosmicum, phosphorated soda.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

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    September 9, 2009