self-controlled love

self-controlled

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Possessing self-control, having mastery of ones own desires.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Meet the world's most financially self-controlled man.

    How to Really Manage Your Credit

  • We should learn how to be more “self-controlled” and be able to see the Goods and Bad, so as to avoid more chaos and self-destruction

    Global Voices in English » Jackie Chan: Chinese need control

  • What cannot be denied is that, by and large, the very largest political demonstrations in Hong Kong are remarkably orderly and self-controlled.

    Notable & Quotable

  • Paddick is so tidy, self-controlled and apparently calm that I wonder if he is a little bit Norwegian?

    The Saturday interview: Brian Paddick

  • And along with their tendency to follow rules, it turns out that they are likely to be highly self-controlled and tend to avoid risks.

    Red Flags or Red Herrings?

  • Meet the world's most financially self-controlled man.

    How to Really Manage Your Credit

  • And along with their tendency to follow rules, it turns out that they are likely to be highly self-controlled and tend to avoid risks.

    Red Flags or Red Herrings?

  • Michael it was, less travelled in the world than Jerry, by nature not so self-controlled, who threw the play-acting of dignity to the wind, and, with shrill whinings of emotion, with body-wrigglings of delight, flashed out his tongue of love and shouldered his brother roughly in eagerness to get near to him.

    CHAPTER XXIV

  • A very self-controlled, confident and handsome man himself, Bruno Dumont, a former philosophy teacher, was very sure of his film aesthetics and explained his view calmly, back erect, as he walked alongside me by the sea, the sun streaming down on us.

    Karin Badt: French Director Bruno Dumont on Outside Satan: "No God but Cinema"

  • For instance, high levels of father involvement are associated with children who are more sociable, confident and self-controlled, and less likely to act out in school or engage in risky behaviors as teenagers, writes journalist Emily Anthes in a review of the scientific literature on the subject.

    Christine Carter, PhD: Fathers Day: Dads: Not Just Back-up Mommys

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