Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An upright pole, post, or support.
  • noun A framework consisting of two or more vertical bars, used to secure cattle in a stall or at a feed trough.
  • transitive verb To equip with stanchions.
  • transitive verb To confine (cattle) by means of stanchions.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A post, pillar, or beam used for a support, as a piece of timber supporting one of the main parts of a roof; a prop.
  • noun One of the upright bars in a stall for cattle.
  • noun In ship-building, an upright post or beam of different forms, used to support the deck, the rails, the nettings, awnings, etc.
  • noun plural In milit. engin., one of the upright side-pieces of a gallery-frame.
  • To fasten to or by a stanchion.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Arch.) A prop or support; a piece of timber in the form of a stake or post, used for a support or stay.
  • noun (Naut.) Any upright post or beam used as a support, as for the deck, the quarter rails, awnings, etc.
  • noun A vertical bar for confining cattle in a stall.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A vertical pole, post, or support.
  • noun A framework of such posts, used to secure or confine cattle.
  • verb To erect stanchions, or equip something with stanchions.
  • verb To confine by means of stanchions, typically used for cattle.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any vertical post or rod used as a support

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English stanchon, from Old French estanchon, probably from estance, act of standing upright, prop, from estans, present participle of ester, to stand, from Latin stāre; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old French estanson, estanchon, (Modern French étançon), from estance ("a stay, a prop"), from Latin stans ("standing"), present participle of stō.

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