Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An upright pole, post, or support.
  • n. A framework consisting of two or more vertical bars, used to secure cattle in a stall or at a feed trough.
  • transitive v. To equip with stanchions.
  • transitive v. To confine (cattle) by means of stanchions.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A vertical pole, post, or support.
  • n. A framework of such posts, used to secure or confine cattle.
  • v. To erect stanchions, or equip something with stanchions.
  • v. To confine by means of stanchions, typically used for cattle.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A prop or support; a piece of timber in the form of a stake or post, used for a support or stay.
  • n. Any upright post or beam used as a support, as for the deck, the quarter rails, awnings, etc.
  • n. A vertical bar for confining cattle in a stall.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To fasten to or by a stanchion.
  • n. A post, pillar, or beam used for a support, as a piece of timber supporting one of the main parts of a roof; a prop.
  • n. One of the upright bars in a stall for cattle.
  • n. In ship-building, an upright post or beam of different forms, used to support the deck, the rails, the nettings, awnings, etc.
  • n. plural In milit. engin., one of the upright side-pieces of a gallery-frame.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any vertical post or rod used as a support

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English stanchon, from Old French estanchon, probably from estance, act of standing upright, prop, from estans, present participle of ester, to stand, from Latin stāre.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old French estanson, estanchon, (Modern French étançon), from estance ("a stay, a prop"), from Latin stans ("standing"), present participle of stō.

Examples

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