Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A representation, especially in writing, made by a seller or company to a purchaser of a product or service that a refund, repair, or replacement will be made if the product or service proves defective or unsatisfactory, especially within a given time period.
  • noun An assurance by the seller of property that the goods or property are as represented or will be as promised.
  • noun The insured's guarantee that the facts are as stated in reference to an insurance risk or that specified conditions will be fulfilled to keep the contract effective.
  • noun A covenant by which the seller of land binds himself or herself and his or her heirs to defend the security of the estate conveyed.
  • noun A judicial writ; a warrant.
  • noun Justification or valid grounds for an act or a course of action.
  • transitive verb To provide a warranty for.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To warrant; guarantee.
  • noun Authority; justificatory man date or precept; warrant.
  • noun Security; assurance; guaranty; warrant.
  • noun In law, a statement, express or implied, of something which the party making it undertakes shall be part of the contract and in confirmation or assurance of a direct object of the contract, but which is yet only collateral to that object.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To warrant; to guarantee.
  • noun (Anc. Law) A covenant real, whereby the grantor of an estate of freehold and his heirs were bound to warrant and defend the title, and, in case of eviction by title paramount, to yield other lands of equal value in recompense. This warranty has long singe become obsolete, and its place supplied by personal covenants for title. Among these is the covenant of warranty, which runs with the land, and is in the nature of a real covenant.
  • noun (Modern Law) An engagement or undertaking, express or implied, that a certain fact regarding the subject of a contract is, or shall be, as it is expressly or impliedly declared or promised to be. In sales of goods by persons in possession, there is an implied warranty of title, but, as to the quality of goods, the rule of every sale is, Caveat emptor.
  • noun (Insurance Law) A stipulation or engagement by a party insured, that certain things, relating to the subject of insurance, or affecting the risk, exist, or shall exist, or have been done, or shall be done. These warranties, when express, should appear in the policy; but there are certain implied warranties.
  • noun rare Justificatory mandate or precept; authority; warrant.
  • noun Security; warrant; guaranty.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Security; warrant; guarantee.
  • noun obsolete, law A covenant real, whereby the granter of an estate of freehold and his heirs were bound to warrant and defend the title, and, in case of eviction by title paramount, to yield other lands of equal value in recompense. This warranty has long since become obsolete, and its place supplied by personal covenants for title. Among these is the covenant of warranty, which runs with the land, and is in the nature of a real covenant.
  • noun law An engagement or undertaking, expressed or implied, that a certain fact regarding the subject of a contract is, or shall be, as it is expressly implied or promised to be. In sales of goods by persons in possession, there is an implied warranty of title.
  • noun insurance law A stipulation or engagement by a party insured, that certain things, relating to the subject of insurance, or affecting the risk, exist, or shall exist, or have been done, or shall be done. These warranties, when expressed, should appear in the policy; but there are certain implied warranties.
  • noun rare Justifying mandate or precept; authority; warrant. Shakespeare
  • verb To warrant; to guarantee.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a written assurance that some product or service will be provided or will meet certain specifications

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English warantie, from Old North French, from feminine past participle of warantir, to guarantee, from warant, warrant; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Anglo-Norman warantie, Old Northern French variant of Old French guarantie (Modern French garantie). More at warrant, guarantee and guaranty.

Examples

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