Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. soccer

Etymologies

wog +‎ ball, since the game is played more by foreigners than by those born in Australia. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Ha! That's exactly how I found out! :)

    August 5, 2009

  • finally, an explanation for Alberto Fujimori.

    I had wondered about him for a long time

    August 5, 2009

  • Madmouth, I had the same eye-opening mindwave when I found out there's a large Japanese immigrant population in Peru. It stands to reason, of course, but it was just something I never thought about. (If desired, silently insert eye-rolling sarcasm about insular, provincial Americans here.)

    I remember being told quite often at the time I lived in Australia that "there are more Greeks in Melbourne than there are in Athens." That doesn't say anything about the Italian-Australian population, but I thought it was interesting nonetheless...

    I also found interesting that there were a bunch of "IAC"s, which stands for Italian-Australian Club. My hometown in PA has an "Italian Lodge," which is essentially the same thing, but being a young and naive cub, I didn't think that other countries would have such things. I have (relatively) fond memories of getting completely blotto at one of the Australian ones.

    August 4, 2009

  • oh, I don't doubt it. it's just hard to conjure the same sort of deli and soccer cafe vision in Australia that one sees in the rest of the West. one is so much more aware of the other populations.

    August 4, 2009

  • Over 800 thousand people (from a total population of about 22 million) claim to have Italian ancestry.

    August 4, 2009

  • I didn't even know there was an Italian immigrant population in Australia! Wordie is Learndie

    August 4, 2009

  • No, I wasn't thinking of wop. I'm familiar with that term (it's also known in the U.S.), but wog was used in my presence in Australia (eons ago) in the same manner (and is not generally known in the U.S.--that I know of).

    August 4, 2009

  • Backronym of posh quality.

    August 4, 2009

  • Isn't 'wog' an acronym for 'western oriental gentleman' (definitely intended as a slur)?

    August 4, 2009

  • c_b, I think you're confusing wog and wop. wog is an anti-Asian (in the British sense, meaning East Indian immigrants) slur. the Mauritius extraction in the Australian origins of wogball fits the term, as Mauritius has a large Hindi population.

    August 4, 2009

  • Ah. Thanks for explaining. My limited understanding of the term 'wog' was that it applied only to Italian immigrants, and of course the term 'wogball' therefore has a far broader background. It makes much more sense now.

    Still kind of a yicky term though...

    August 4, 2009

  • Wog is Australian slang for a migrant, especially of non-British origin.

    During the time Warren was a player and then commentator, a lot of teams were ethnically-based. In any given league you would typically find a team of Italian migrants, Greek migrants, Yugoslav migrants and so on. In my university days I even remember coming up against a team whose players were all from Mauritius of all places. Hence there was a perception that football was a sport played only by wogs --> wogball. The truth was that anglo-Australians played football as much as any other sport.

    In the revamped national league (only 4 seasons old), and indeed in most state leagues, clubs are now forbidden from using ethnic names and symbols. Hence no more South Melbourne Hellas, Preston Makedonia, Canberra Croatia, Sydney Hakoah, etc.

    August 3, 2009

  • Wogball? Really? Where did that term come from?

    August 3, 2009

  • "Wogball they used to call it, a term that irritated the hell out of Johnny Warren, the legendary soccer commentator who played in Australia's World Cup side in 1974. Warren was a driving force in demanding that the game in Australia be called football, not soccer, because to his ears soccer was an ugly word and football a beautiful one."
    - Greg Callaghan, In leaps and bounds, theaustralian.com.au, 3 August 2009.

    August 3, 2009