carolinacc has looked up 0 words, created 1 list, listed 79 words, written 36 comments, added 62 tags, and loved 1 word.

Comments by carolinacc

  • foul or poisonous air; stench

    May 10, 2009

  • King Charles VI of France and five of his courtiers were dressed as woodwoses and chained together for a mascarade at the tragic Bal des Sauvages (later known as the Bal des Ardents) at the Queen Mother's Paris hotel, January 28, 1393. In the midst of the festivities, a stray spark from a torch set their hairy costumes ablaze, burning several courtiers alive; the king's own life was saved through quick action by his aunt, the Duchesse de Berry, who smothered the flames in her cloak.

    May 8, 2009

  • the frost performs its secret ministry
    un helped by any wind

    (Coleridge)

    May 8, 2009

  • Abominably filthy; i.e. resembling the stable of Augeas, a fabulous king of Elis, which contained 3,000 oxen, and had been uncleansed for 30 years, when Hercules, by turning the river Alpheus through it, purified it in a single day.

    oed

    April 8, 2009

  • trans. and intr. To stiffen as with cold, to congeal.

    March 25, 2009

  • for he that prates his secrets,
    his heart stands on the outside

    The Revenger's Tragedy

    I wonder how that links to the quote above...

    March 23, 2009

  • Dishonest, thief-like

    March 23, 2009

  • a nouveau riche?

    March 23, 2009

  • Yei! Trippy cartoons!

    March 6, 2009

  • Oh, I think this is the kind of colds that hysterical and thin women get!

    March 6, 2009

  • When texting with someone over IM or SMS that takes too long to reply leaving you waiting and frustrated.
    "She takes forever; texting with Sara leaves me textually frustrated" (Urban Dictionary)

    January 5, 2009

  • "it strewed the whole of the north-western coast of Europe with wrecks" - Leigh Hunt; Autobiography

    December 21, 2008

  • 2. skewer (transitive verb)

    Function:
    transitive verb
    Date:
    1701

    1 : to fasten or pierce with or as if with a skewer 2 : to criticize or ridicule sharply and effectively

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/skewer2

    December 16, 2008

  • pantomancer: One who sees omens in every event

    December 9, 2008

  • when eating food so good that you let out an involuntary moan, usually the first bite; also as an adjective - flavorgasmic
    I ate this unbelievable steak yesterday. I swear when I ate the first bite I had a total flavorgasm

    December 6, 2008

  • the rewriting of history/editing of memory, in order to justify one's current position

    November 13, 2008

  • a small book or notebook of phrases, quotes and notes used in the ancient world. Foucault mentions it.

    October 28, 2008

  • I believe "precious little" is a beautiful expression, as in "So much needed to be changed in academic life and society at large, and precious little of all that 60's rebelliousness made an impact". Gatochy

    October 19, 2008

  • An ounce of action is worth a ton of theory.

    -Friedrich Engels

    October 19, 2008

  • Imagination was given to us to compensate for what we are not; a sense of humor was given to us to console us for what we are.

    -Mark McGinnis

    October 15, 2008

  • “Que yo sepa, nadie ha formulado hasta el ahora una teoría del prólogo. La omisión no debe afligirnos, ya que todos sabemos de qué se trata. El prólogo, en la triste mayoría de los casos, linda con la oratoria de sobremesa o con los panegíricos fúnebres y abunda en hipérboles irresponsables que la lectura incrédula acepta como convenciones del género. ... El prólogo, cuando son propicios los astros, no es una forma subalterna del brindis; es una especie lateral de la crítica�?. Jorge Luis Borges en PRÓLOGOS CON UN PRÓLOGO DE PRÓLOGOS.

    September 28, 2008

  • (n) : a mixing or blending; the mixing or blending of race in marriage or breeding

    August 8, 2008

  • This word seems like an exaggeration of verbosity just to indicate someone is a fool. Also, since it it rather complicated to articulate, the sayer risks the chance of making a fool of herself.

    August 8, 2008

  • And, as Kant brilliantly showed, the person who is acquainted with the self, who refers to himself as ‘I’, is inescapably trapped into freedom.

    source: http://www.axess.se/english/2008/01/theme_scruton.php.htm

    August 6, 2008

  • adoxography
    n. eloquent praise of a worthless thing

    July 7, 2008

  • Well, the telling of jokes is an art of its own, and it always rises from some emotional threat. The best jokes are dangerous, and dangerous because they are in some way truthful.


    Kurt Vonnegut, Interview, Mcsweeneys.net

    July 5, 2008

  • Pertaining to the greek god Dionysius, the twice-born.

    July 1, 2008

  • Equivalent of spanish 'cuyo'

    June 8, 2008

  • Equivalent of spanish 'cuyo'

    June 8, 2008

  • neume or neum (nm, nym)
    n.
    A sign used in the notation of plainsong during the Middle Ages, surviving today in transcriptions of Gregorian chants.

    Middle English, series of notes sung on one syllable, from Medieval Latin pneuma, from Greek, breath; see pneuma.

    June 3, 2008

  • v. t. 1. To burn.

    June 3, 2008

  • En español: argiloso, sa., que tiene arcilla

    June 3, 2008

  • without (german)

    June 3, 2008

  • ge·sund·heit (g-zntht)
    interj.

    Used to wish good health to a person who has just sneezed.

    June 3, 2008

  • yearn (yûrn)
    intr.v. yearned, yearn·ing, yearns
    1. To have a strong, often melancholy desire.
    2. To feel deep pity, sympathy, or tenderness: yearned over the child's fate.

    Middle English yernen, from Old English geornan, giernan; see gher-2 in Indo-European roots.

    June 3, 2008

  • jet·ti·son (jt-sn, -zn)
    tr.v. jet·ti·soned, jet·ti·son·ing, jet·ti·sons
    1. To cast overboard or off: a ship jettisoning wastes; a pilot jettisoning aircraft fuel.
    2. Informal To discard (something) as unwanted or burdensome: jettisoned the whole marketing plan.
    n.
    1. The act of discarding or casting overboard.
    2. Jetsam.

    From Middle English jetteson, a throwing overboard of goods to lighten ship, from Anglo-Norman getteson, from Vulgar Latin *iectti, iecttin-, from *iecttus, past participle of *iectre, to throw; see jet2.

    June 3, 2008

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