pspealman has looked up 0 words, created 5 lists, listed 65 words, written 30 comments, added 1 tag, and loved 0 words.

Comments by pspealman

  • A word which sounds like - but is not - a coy euphemism for something scandal-icious.

    March 10, 2009

  • Spanish. Literally, to un-body somebody. The sentiment is best understood in Enlgish as to make one a non-entity by disrespect.

    December 8, 2008

  • It may be a gum. The word comes from the King James Bible where the corresponding word in Hebrew is בדלח (ḇəd�?lah) - but this is only used twice in the bible and occurs no where else but there.

    The kicker is that bible scholars have offered arguments that it referrers to many things - but no one can say definitively what it is. Since the definition is lost but the word is still in use it is an ultimately unstranslatable word.

    December 8, 2008

  • From Philosophical Lexicon.
    A term that is untranslatable, except in a language which is an exact copy of the language in which the term appears.

    Based on Kazimierz Ajdukiewicz.

    December 7, 2008

  • Swedish. Literally, "Oh no, the devil is walking on dry ground!". The actual usage though is as an exclamation of surprise.

    Thanks to pondpond for this.

    December 7, 2008

  • Italian. The word for an attractively mustachioed lady.

    December 7, 2008

  • Quite right bilby, this variation is in the "I" tense, "I make little shoes". The other version seems more prevalent (internet wise) - but isn't what I know.

    In hindsight, I guess I sound vaguely deficient of mind to any Italians when I go out to eat.

    December 7, 2008

  • Italian. Used to describe the activity of cleaning one's food off one's plate with a bit of bread. Literally it is, "to make with little shoes".

    December 7, 2008

  • Oops, dropped the "danish" - sorry about that.

    December 7, 2008

  • What is "to do an eleventh President (of the U.S.) to someone?"

    Quite rude when "Manifest Destiny" encounters her "Mexican Territories".

    December 7, 2008

  • Legend has it they have over twenty words to describe the various ways of waiting outside in the weather while the host puts off their iktsuarpok-ing duties.

    December 7, 2008

  • Japanese. When one inwardly holds a belief they consider true but outwardly projects another belief because of the social disfavor for the former. Similar to a toned down version of heretic when crossed with liar. Additionally, it has the connotation of proper behavior.

    December 7, 2008

  • Polish. The term for a person who worked as a telegraphist for the resistance movements on the Soviet side of the Iron Curtain.

    December 7, 2008

  • Spanish. The name comes from a feline of Pampas plains in Argentina and was chosen as the name for a line of Mitsubishi SUVs.
    It has the common usage, however, as something like 'to masturbate lazily'.

    December 7, 2008

  • A Finnish term with no exact parallel in English but which is best approximated by the idea of an amount of something which is just right for what is needed. A equivalent of 'not too much, nor too little' achievement.

    December 7, 2008

  • Spanish, the literal translation is 'big sunflower seed' but that isn't how it is used.

    December 7, 2008

  • You are quite right - the slip of an i where an l was intended.

    December 7, 2008

  • A acronym of the Hebrew phrase "beelbool beytseem le-lo takhleet" which translates literally as "bothering someone's testicles for no reason".

    The usage of the term is similar to the English use of 'baloney' to connote a lie of certain incredulity.

    December 7, 2008

  • A literal translation for the type of woman who stands on her doorstep yelling obscenities at her kids.
    The actual usage of the term is less kind.

    December 7, 2008

  • aka: póshlost

    Vladimir Nabokov claimed this was the hardest of Russian terms to translate as it means both common, vulgar, and banal.

    December 7, 2008

  • From Brazilian Portuguese. Used to describe running one’s fingers through someones hair in a tender, loving, fashion.

    December 7, 2008

  • Inuit term for going outside to see if anyone is coming or has already arrived.

    December 7, 2008

  • From Japanese. Word for a mother who pushes her children toward academic achievement relentlessly.

    December 7, 2008

  • A word from Czech. It is the wonderfully mischievous use of a cell phone to call someone only to hang up before they pick up the line. The intention, instead of being a nuisance, being to signal them without being charged for the call.

    December 7, 2008

  • An Arabic word used to work around the lacuna for 'compromise' - a word for word translation puts it as 'I win, you win'.

    December 7, 2008

  • According to Christopher J. Moore - this word also has connotations similar to the Mafia's use of 'favors'. One can accumulate guanxi and spend guanxi like social currency.

    December 7, 2008

  • Ye olde bit box slang for a call to a empty buffer.

    October 26, 2008

  • I originally spotted this one in my Compact Spanish Translation Dictionary ... coincidentally my actual dictionary lacks it.

    Is it in the Spanish dictionary because of a need for me to know it, is it a common characteristic to Spanish speaking people? One day you speak too many double L's as Y's and that vein on the leg just goes nuts?

    October 1, 2008

  • A term for one's 'lived experience' - similar to a world view but including elements which are wholly subjective and beyond communication.

    October 1, 2008

  • An ambush of a military type. I first found it in Lattimore's translation of the Iliad.

    October 1, 2008

Comments for pspealman

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • pspealman:

    Welcome to wordie! Excellent lists. I especially like Angela's rashes, which also appears on the 'Change one Letter' list.

    December 7, 2008