Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Avicenna 980-1037. Persian physician and Neo-Platonist philosopher noted for his Canon of Medicine, a standard medical textbook used in Europe until the 17th century.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. Western name of Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Sīnā commonly known as Ibn Sīnā, a Persian polymath

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. Arabian physician and influential Islamic philosopher; his interpretation of Aristotle influenced St. Thomas Aquinas; writings on medicine were important for almost 500 years (980-1037)

Etymologies

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Examples

  • But, in Avicenna's view, a wetnurse was necessary because the mother was too weak from her labor to provide milk. 125 The possibility of corruption at the outset of lactation paralleled the belief that external forces could effect negative changes in its quality.

    A Tender Age: Cultural Anxieties over the Child in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries

  • This attracted Ali ibn-Sina (aka Avicenna in West), who cured the sultan and wrote a remarkably accurate medical handbook, used in the Europe until the 19th century (a museum devoted to him is in the suburbs).

    Scott S. Smith: Art and Architecture of the Silk Road

  • Ibn Sina, better known as Avicenna, a man of Persian origin, was a

    The Faith of Islam

  • The first of the Arabians, known throughout the Middle Ages as the Prince, the rival, indeed, of Galen, was the Persian Ibn Sina, better known as Avicenna, one of the greatest names in the history of medicine.

    The Evolution of Modern Medicine

  • A favourite principle of Avicenna, which is quoted not only by Averroes but also by the Schoolmen, and especially by St. Albert the Great, was intellectus in formis agit universalitatem, that is, the universality of our ideas is the result of the activity of the mind itself.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 2: Assizes-Browne

  • Prince, the rival, indeed, of Galen, was the Persian Ibn Sina, better known as Avicenna, one of the greatest names in the history of medicine.

    The Evolution of Modern Medicine A Series of Lectures Delivered at Yale University on the Silliman Foundation in April, 1913

  • In the famous attack by al-Ghazali (d. 1111) in his Incoherence of the Philosophers, thinkers such as Avicenna were condemned for heresy for their failure to demonstrate the supposed Qur™anic account of physical resurrection and the reality of the afterlife.

    Mulla Sadra

  • Again Arabs such as Avicenna and Abū'l-Barakāt had used equivalent Arabic termi - nology to express the same idea, and thirteenth-century

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • Isidore certainly influenced Muslim scholars in Spain but, Bede apart, no Christian scholar from the mid-7th to early 11th century made an original contribution to scholarship comparable to those of Muslims such as Avicenna and Averroes or Jews such as Moses Maimonides.

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • By the 13th century numerous versions of the theory had emerged, but Thomas Aquinas seems to have largely adopted that of the Arab philosopher Avicenna although not without some modifications.

    Matt J. Rossano: The Theological Dilemma Of Medieval Neuroscience

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