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Examples

  • Where be they who abode in Ispahan and the land of Khorasan?

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The sensual pairing of lychees and roses has met with such approval, it would seem, that Ispahan is trying out new shapes and forms, in a bid to tantalize the public anew.

    Archive 2005-02-01

  • The Shah did not arrive in Ispahan until two weeks after we reached it.

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • That of Sheeraz has, of course, a wide reputation, and the wine of Ispahan is thought not much inferior.

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • In the present day it would be difficult for a numerous party of Englishmen to find subsistence in Ispahan, much less live there in splendour.

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • Ispahan is beginning to recover from the deep ruin into which it had fallen.

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • Ispahan is the land of promise for pigeons; they swarm like locusts, and not only are never eaten, but are highly cherished and thrive accordingly.

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • Very quickly, for anyone who -- gasp -- doesn't know about Hermé's popular creation, Ispahan is a city in Iran, but it's also the name of this rose, and I am assuming it was the latter that Hermé had in his mind when he came up with the Ispahan: Flamingo pink macarons sandwiching rose-infused cream, fresh lychees, and raspberries; a red rose petal set on top; and of course the crowning touch, a glistening glucose dew drop beading on the petal.

    Archive 2005-02-01

  • Ispahan is mine own country and I have there a cousin, the daughter of my father’s brother, whom I loved from my childhood and cherished with fond affection; but a people stronger than we fell upon us in foray and taking me among other booty, cut off my yard58 and sold me for a castrato, whilst I was yet a lad; and this is how I came to be in such case. —

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Ispahan is twenty-four days’ journey from Tauris, and Casbin half way between, them (Voyages de

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

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  • A very good friend's mother is a weaver from Isfahan.
    May someday I weave the mosaic roses of the other half) and drink sheer oz!

    March 16, 2011

  • Sing the gardens, my heart, that you do not know; like gardens
    poured in glass, clear, unattainable.
    Waters and roses of Ispahan or of Shiraz,
    blissfully sing them, praise them, comparable to none
    .

    From the Sonnets to Orpheus by Rainer Maria Rilke, translated by M.D. Herter Norton.

    There's a part in there about weaving, too:

    Avoid the error of thinking something is missed
    for the resolve once taken, this: to be!
    Silken thread, you became part of the weaving.

    Whichever the picture you are inherently one with
    (be it even a moment out of the life of pain),
    feel that the whole, the glorious carpet is meant.

    September 27, 2010