Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • A trademark used for a loud electric horn.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • KLAXON: The Annoying – Klaxon, a giant space alien, is not very powerful, so it can’t really cause any actual damage itself, and it can’t really harm anyone ……directly – BUT – it’s really really loud and annoying.

    THE HOST « FranksFilms

  • Being a lawprof, I hear "Klaxon" and think of the Erie doctrine, but the definition I'm picking up from the dictionary is "A trademark used for a loud electric horn."

    "We wanted something intimate, and we listen to Tori Amos when we're alone."

  • As I said the words, a Klaxon called, alarm bells rang, and other noises like elephants farting to death through didgeridoos, growling mice, and trampled zebra split the air.

    Crossed

  • He always stopped at the top of our street and blew his Klaxon.

    imperfect endings

  • The only sound on the street is the trilling of the warning Klaxon as the truck reverses off the street, beyond the sidewalk, and onto the driveway, and the payload glides upward pivoting on its hinge.

    MY EMPIRE OF DIRT

  • The anachronism stood out like a Klaxon in the otherwise modern office suite.

    Starfleet Academy: The Edge

  • In the silence of the observation deck, it sounded as loud as the red alert Klaxon on a starship.

    Starfleet Academy: The Edge

  • Then it continued in a tangle of voices, with the wail of the Klaxon breaking in at odd times, most of the words flying by too fast for the frog to render clearly.

    Behemoth

  • Finally he agreed to help the count and Hoffman escape, and with one last shriek of the Klaxon, the bullfrog went silent.

    Behemoth

  • Would he guess what the ringing battle Klaxon meant and try to escape?

    LEVIATHAN

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Comments

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  • The klaxon horn produced its characteristic sound by striking a spring-steel diaphragm with the teeth of a rotating cogwheel. The diaphragm attaches to a horn that acts as an acoustic transformer and controls the direction of the sound.

    March 26, 2011

  • See comments at klaxon.

    June 30, 2010