Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The loss of an initial, usually unstressed vowel, as in cute from acute.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The loss of the initial unstressed vowel of a word.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The loss of a short unaccented vowel at the beginning of a word; -- the result of a phonetic process.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The gradual and unintentional removal of a short unaccented vowel at the beginning of a word; a special form of apheresis, as in squire for esquire, down for adown, etc.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the gradual disappearance of an initial (usually unstressed) vowel or syllable as in `squire' for `esquire'

Etymologies

Greek, a release, from aphīenai, aphe-, to let go : apo-, apo- + hīenai, to send; see diesis.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Ancient Greek ἄφεσις (áphesis, "letting go"), from ἀφίημι (aphíēmi) , from ἀπό (apó, "off") + ἵημι (híēmi, "send forth"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Bated here is a contraction of abated through loss of the unstressed first vowel a process called aphesis; it means “reduced, lessened, lowered in force”.

    Watch This: 44 Inch Chest Official Trailer with Ray Winstone « FirstShowing.net

  • Among phonetic changes which occur with more or less regularity are those called aphesis, epenthesis, epithesis, assimilation, dissimilation, and metathesis, convenient terms which are less learned than they appear.

    The Romance of Names

  • [38] But anesis and aphesis in I.Esd. iv. 62 looks like a word-play in what may not be original Greek; though a Semitic original of that section of I.Esd. (iii. 1 to v. 6) is by no means proved.

    The Three Additions to Daniel: A Study.

  • But this transformation of the [Greek: aphesis hamartiôn] into [Greek: charis metanoias] plainly shews that Clement had merely taken over from tradition the special estimate of the death of Christ as procuring salvation; for it is meaningless to deduce the [Greek: charis metanoias] from the blood of Christ.

    History of Dogma, Volume 1 (of 7)

  • Testament was +paresis+ preparing the way for the complete +aphesis+ of the New.

    History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology

  • There were other charges brought against Cocceius, however, one of which was his distinction between +aphesis hamartiôn+ and +paresis hamartiôn+, by which he held that the former was a complete pardon, but the latter incomplete, and only in force under the old dispensation.

    History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology

  • _ [Greek: aphesis amartiôn] _ never means _forgiveness, _ one form at least of _God's_ sending away of sins; neither do I say that the taking of the phrase to mean _repentance for the remission of sins_, namely, repentance in order to obtain the pardon of God, involves any inconsistency; but I say that the word _ [Greek: eis] _ rather _unto_ than

    Hope of the Gospel

  • The oratorio's text accordingly contained references to "breaking bonds asunder" and "casting away yokes," recalling the early Christian belief that the Messiah's reign would bring liberty (Hebrew deror or debt cancellation) and release (Greek aphesis) from debt bondage.

    Slugger O'Toole

  • (Hebrew deror or debt cancellation) and release (Greek aphesis) from debt bondage.

    GlobalResearch.ca

  • * gnōston estō humin, hoti dia toutou humin aphesis hamartiōn katangelletai apo pantōn hōn ouk ēdunēthēte en nomō Mōuseōs dikaiōthēnai: [1084] 1

    The Mission and Expansion of Christianity in the First Three Centuries

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