Definitions

from The American HeritageĀ® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A unit of volume or capacity in the U.S. Customary System, used in dry measure and equal to 4 pecks, 2,150.42 cubic inches, or 35.24 liters.
  • n. A unit of volume or capacity in the British Imperial System, used in dry and liquid measure and equal to 2,219.36 cubic inches or 36.37 liters. See Table at measurement.
  • n. A container with the capacity of a bushel.
  • n. Informal A large amount; a great deal: We have bushels of time, so relax.
  • transitive v. To alter or mend (clothing).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A dry measure, containing four pecks, eight gallons (36.4 L), or thirty-two quarts.
  • n. A vessel of the capacity of a bushel, used in measuring; a bushel measure.
  • n. A quantity that fills a bushel measure; as, a heap containing ten bushels of apples.
  • n. A large indefinite quantity.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A dry measure, containing four pecks, eight gallons, or thirty-two quarts.
  • n. A vessel of the capacity of a bushel, used in measuring; a bushel measure.
  • n. A quantity that fills a bushel measure.
  • n. A large indefinite quantity.
  • n. The iron lining in the nave of a wheel. [Eng.] In the United States it is called a box. See 4th Bush.
  • v. To mend or repair, as men's garments; to repair garments.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To mend, as a man's garment; repair men's garments.
  • n. A dry measure, containing 8 gallons or 4 pecks.
  • n. A vessel of the capacity of a bushel.
  • n. An indefinitely large quantity. [Colloq.]
  • n. Same as bush, 2. [U. S.]

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a British imperial capacity measure (liquid or dry) equal to 4 pecks
  • n. a United States dry measure equal to 4 pecks or 2152.42 cubic inches
  • v. restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken

Etymologies

Middle English, from Anglo-Norman bussel, variant of Old French boissiel, from boisse, one sixth of a bushel, of Celtic origin.
Probably from German bosseln, to do odd jobs, alteration (perhaps influenced by bosseln, to emboss) of basteln, to rig up, mend, probably from Bast, bast fiber (used to make rope), from Middle High German bast, from Old High German.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French boissel (compare French boisseau), from boisseĀ ("grain measure"), of Gaulish origin. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • A small dam. --Dr. Jamieson's Scottish Dictionary and Supplement, 1841.

    May 26, 2011