Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A light, open, two-wheeled carriage, drawn by two horses abreast.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A light two wheeled carriage large enough for the driver and a passenger and drawn by a carefully-matched pair.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A small or short course.
  • n. A two-wheeled chaise drawn by two horses abreast.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To drive in a curricle.
  • n. A chaise or carriage with two wheels, drawn by two horses abreast.
  • n. . A short course.

Etymologies

From Latin curriculum, course, racing chariot, from currere, to run; see current.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From the Latin 'curriculum', meaning 'racing chariot' (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The word curricle made Charles Musgrove jump up that he might compare it with his own; the servant in mourning roused Anne's curiosity, and the whole six were collected to look, by the time the owner of the curricle was to be seen issuing from the door amidst the bows and civilities of the household, and taking his seat, to drive off.

    Persuasion

  • Swindlery and Blackguardism have stretched hands across the Channel, and saluted mutually: on the racecourse of Vincennes or Sablons, behold in English curricle-and-four, wafted glorious among the principalities and rascalities, an English Dr. Dodd, (Adelung, Geschichte der Menschlichen Narrheit, para Dodd.) -- for whom also the too early gallows gapes.

    The French Revolution

  • Theres a lake in front with boatsful of nobillaty and musitions floting on its placid sufface — and a curricle is a driving up to the grand hentrance, and me in it, with

    The diary of C. Jeames De La Pluche, Esq., with his letters

  • The word curricle made Charles Musgrove jump up that he might compare it with his own; the servant in mourning roused Anne’s curiosity, and the whole six were collected to look, by the time the owner of the curricle was to be seen issuing from the door amidst the bows and civilities of the household, and taking his seat, to drive off.

    Persuasion

  • "Curriculo collegisse juvat" -- are there any individuals to whom their curricle has been a college, and who have done without a university in the strength of a fast-trotting horse?

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 54, No. 333, July 1843

  • With a rapid, jingling drive to the harbour in a two - wheeled machine (which Captain Mitchell called a curricle) behind a fleet and scraggy mule beaten all the time by an obviously Neapolitan driver, the cycle would be nearly closed before the lighted-up offices of the O.S. N. Company, remaining open so late because of the steamer.

    Nostromo: a Tale of the Seaboard

  • Theres a lake in front with boatsful of nobillaty and musitions floting on its placid sufface -- and a curricle is a driving up to the grand hentrance, and me in it, with Mrs., or perhaps Lady Hangelana de la Pluche.

    Burlesques

  • A very short trial convinced her that a curricle was the prettiest equipage in the world; the chaise and four wheeled off with some grandeur, to be sure, but it was a heavy and troublesome business, and she could not easily forget its having stopped two hours at Petty France.

    Northanger Abbey

  • My curricle, which is now at the door, will be more convenient than a chaise; and I will engage to be back before to-morrow morning.

    Thaddeus of Warsaw

  • A very short trial convinced her that a curricle was the prettiest equipage in the world; the chaise-and-four wheeled off with some grandeur, to be sure, but it was a heavy and troublesome business, and she could not easily forget its having stopped two hours at Petty-France.

    Northanger Abbey

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  • "Mrs Ilbert, arriving in Quebec in 1807, was pleased to learn that even in winter, 'There are frequently very pleasant excursions, made by parties into the country, they are Pic Nic parties where each person takes something towards the Entertainment, they drive to some house a few miles from Quebec, carry a Fidler with them & when they have finished their repast, they rise & dance until they agree upon separating, when the curricles (carriages) are ordered & the parties jovially return to their habitations, some get overturned but no accidents are ever met with but they only fall on a bed of snow, have a roll or two, to the great amusement of the Spectators, get up, shake themselves & resume their Seats.'"
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 193–194

    May 18, 2010

  • Usage on barouche.

    October 22, 2008

  • cf coracle

    July 24, 2008

  • a great citation on wiktionary:
    "Not since the year 17--, when milord Castlebrilliant's curricle was whirled to sea with her ladyship within, had there been such vehement weather."
    - Ronald Firbank, Valmouth (1919)

    July 24, 2008