Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One that determines.
  • n. Grammar A word belonging to a group of noun modifiers, which includes articles, demonstratives, possessive adjectives, and words such as any, both, or whose, and, in English, occupying the first position in a noun phrase or following another determiner.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A member of a class of words functioning in a noun phrase to identify or distinguish a referent without describing or modifying it. Examples of determiners include articles (a, the), demonstratives (this, those), cardinal numbers (three, fifty), and indefinite numerals (most, any, each).
  • n. A dependent function in a noun phrase marking the NP as definite or indefinite. This function is usually filled by words in the determinative class but may be filled by other elements such as a genitive pronoun.
  • n. Something that determines, or helps someone to determine, something else.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who, or that which, determines or decides.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who decides or determines.
  • n. A determinant bachelor in a university. See determinant, 2.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an argument that is conclusive
  • n. one of a limited class of noun modifiers that determine the referents of noun phrases
  • n. a determining or causal element or factor

Etymologies

to determine + -er (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • Term used in the CGEL for the functional position at the front of a noun phrase (often called specifier by others). It can be filled by either determinatives (as they call them, members of the word class containing a, the, one, two, each, no, all etc.) or by genitive noun phrases (my, your, Mary's, the Prince of Denmark's, the bloke I was talking to's, etc.).

    August 15, 2008

  • Group of words such as definite and indefinite article, any, some etc.

    June 17, 2008