Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Hungry; greedy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Very hungry or greedy; ravenous.
  • adj. avid
  • n. One who is hungry or greedy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Inclined to eat; hungry; voracious.
  • n. One who is hungry or greedy.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Inclined to eat; hungry.
  • n. One who is hungry or greedy.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. extremely hungry
  • adj. devouring or craving food in great quantities
  • adj. (often followed by `for') ardently or excessively desirous

Etymologies

Latin ēsuriēns, ēsurient-, present participle of ēsurīre, desiderative of edere, to eat; see ed- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin esurire ("hungry, desiderative verb"), from edō ("to eat"). Etymological twin to edacious ("voracious, ravenous"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Antonia D. said, "Is it not amazing that the moment I have read the word esurient a trace of something I knew pressed me to bring it back to life again (that is, to ..."

    Visual Thesaurus : Online Edition

  • Obama's dignified elevation of our national discourse through honesty, depth, and nuance was greeted by ratings-esurient tabloid news, race-baiting commentary, and rancorous replay of Wright -- ad nauseam.

    Shaun Jacob Halper: Beyond Jeremiah: A New Kind of Media for Obama's New Kind of Politics

  • It had been a relief for Ted after Connie's death, not to mention after the esurient pursuing by other women to which he'd been exposed, to find himself in the company of a woman who wanted to build a structure first before taking up residence within it.

    A Traitor to Memory

  • Eight credits per week went to the company, in advance, for room and board; the rest he spent over the fat man's bar or gambled away at the fat man's crooked games-for Bominger, although engaged in vaster commerce far, nevertheless allowed no scruple to interfere with his esurient rapacity.

    Gray Lensman

  • He drew tears from them with the pathos of his picture of the bereaved widow Mabey and her three starving, destitute children -- "orphaned to avenge the death of a pheasant" -- and the bereaved mother of that M. de Vilmorin, a student of Rennes, known here to many of them, who had met his death in a noble endeavour to champion the cause of an esurient member of their afflicted order.

    Scaramouche

  • "Oscar -- the amiable, irresponsible, esurient Oscar -- with no more sense of a picture than of the fit of a coat, has the courage of the opinions .... of others!"

    Oscar Wilde His Life and Confessions

  • He will be living on a great flat earth -- unless some officious person has tried to muddle his wits by telling him the earth is round; amidst trees, animals, men, houses, engines, utensils, that are all capable of being good or naughty, all fond of nice things and hostile to nasty ones, all thumpable and perishable, and all conceivably esurient.

    Mankind in the Making

  • He will be living on a great flat earth — unless some officious person has tried to muddle his wits by telling him the earth is round; amidst trees, animals, men, houses, engines, utensils, that are all capable of being good or naughty, all fond of nice things and hostile to nasty ones, all thumpable and perishable, and all conceivably esurient.

    Mankind in the Making

  • If she do not gravitate too irresistibly towards that class of New-Era people (which includes whatsoever we have of prurient, esurient, morbid, flimsy, and in fact pitiable and unprofitable, and is at a sad discount among men of sense), she may get into good tracks of inquiry and connection here, and be very useful to herself and others.

    The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1834-1872, Vol II

  • It is to be hoped that a numerous and enterprising generation of writers will follow and surpass the present one; but it would be better if the stream were stayed, and the roll of our old, honest English books were closed, than that esurient book-makers should continue and debase a brave tradition, and lower, in their own eyes, a famous race.

    Essays in the Art of Writing

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • What art can be ever of pure intent
    For nudes, while noble, are prurient,
    And still lifes with fishes
    And fruit piled in dishes
    Appeal to the passions esurient?

    July 19, 2014

  • In addition, escurient means A. pertaining to appetite or the love of eating; gastronomic; B. a greedy person (Oxford English Dictionary).

    July 28, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • Indeed! :-D

    (Unfortunately, using such dainty words is only half as much fun when no one understands you . . .)

    January 6, 2010

  • Really? That's iroquoisy.

    January 6, 2010

  • Wonderful, it’s Word of the Day and I used it just this Monday (two days ago).

    January 6, 2010

  • Monty Python used this word in the 'Cheese Shop' sketch

    July 11, 2009

  • extremely hungry

    July 17, 2007