Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To state untruthfully; misrepresent.
  • transitive v. To make false by altering or adding to: falsify testimony.
  • transitive v. To counterfeit; forge: falsify a visa.
  • transitive v. To declare or prove to be false.
  • intransitive v. To make untrue statements; lie.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To alter so as to be false; to make incorrect.
  • v. To misrepresent.
  • v. To prove to be false.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To tell lies; to violate the truth.
  • transitive v. To make false; to represent falsely.
  • transitive v. To counterfeit; to forge.
  • transitive v. To prove to be false, or untrustworthy; to confute; to disprove; to nullify; to make to appear false.
  • transitive v. To violate; to break by falsehood.
  • transitive v. To baffle or escape.
  • transitive v. To avoid or defeat; to prove false, as a judgment.
  • transitive v. To show, in accounting, (an inem of charge inserted in an account) to be wrong.
  • transitive v. To make false by multilation or addition; to tamper with.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To make false or deceptive; cause to vary from truth or genuineness; change so as to deceive; sophisticate; adulterate; misrepresent: as, to falsify accounts, weights and measures, or commodities; to falsify a person's meaning.
  • To make a false representation of; counterfeit; forge.
  • To show to be erroneous or incorrect; disprove: as, the event falsified his words.
  • To violate; break by falsehood or treachery: as, to falsify one's faith or word.
  • To cause to fail or become false; baffle; make useless: as, to falsify a person's aim.
  • To feign, as a blow. Same as false, v. t., 5.
  • In law: To prove to be false, as a judgment; avoid or defeat.
  • In equity, to show to be erroneous, as an item claimed on the credit side of an account.
  • To tell falsehoods; lie; violate the truth.
  • n. In fencing, a feint; a baffling thrust.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. prove false
  • v. falsify knowingly
  • v. insert words into texts, often falsifying it thereby
  • v. make false by mutilation or addition; as of a message or story
  • v. tamper, with the purpose of deception

Etymologies

Middle English falsifien, from Old French falsifier, from Late Latin falsificāre : Latin falsus, false; see false + Latin -ficāre, -fy.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French falsifier, from Late Latin falsificāre, present active infinitive of falsificō ("make false, corrupt, counterfeit, falsify"), from Latin falsificus, from falsus ("false"), corresponding to false +‎ -ify. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Also, as pointed out before, if we are able to find an object of sufficient mass within the Schwarzschild radius, which normally would continue to collapse into a gravitational singularity (Black Hole) but has not, that would disprove the theory of Black holes right there, or in other words falsify them.

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • Instead, he argues that the logic of scientific research is a critical method in which scientists do their best to "falsify" their hypotheses and theories.

    Revisiting Popper

  • It looks like you have addressed T&G's main arguments (eg, about the 2nd law), but I wonder if it might be appropriate to put in a brief description of what it means to "falsify" something in the scientific sense -- ie, essentially what T&G must show (and failed to show) to make their case that there is no greenhouse effect:

    Rabett Run

  • I didn't use the word "falsify", I used the word "disconfirming" … they are not necessarily the same thing.

    Congratulations are in Order

  • If these 'actions' please them, the investigating officers would then "falsify" their investigation results all the way up to make our unit look good.

    Chen's Speech on the Recall

  • Which brings me to if we are able to find an object of sufficient mass within the Schwarzschild radius, which normally would continue to collapse into a gravitational singularity (Black Hole) but has not, that would disprove the theory of Black holes right there, or in other words falsify them. "

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • We turn again to the second letter to the Corinthians, where St. Paul writes: "For we are not like the many who trade literally: "water down," "falsify" on the word of God; but as out of sincerity, indeed as from God and in the presence of God, we speak in Christ" (2 Corinthians 2:17); and Saint Peter, in his first letter exhorts Christians saying: "Whoever preaches, let it be as with the words of God" (1 Peter 4:11).

    Archive 2008-02-24

  • Bad science can happen when there is not the sense of accountability or need for independent verification, or worse if there is the incentive of money and fame to falsify data.

    About: Blinded by Science

  • However, falsifying the privileged planet hypothesis would also falsify our specialness in God's sight.

    About: The Progressive Diminishment of Man

  • Much easier to falsify ideas in laboratory controlled conditions versus speculations about the deep past.

    About: Blinded by Science

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