flower-de-luce love

Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A genus of perennial herbs (Iris) with swordlike leaves and large three-petaled flowers often of very gay colors, but probably white in the plant first chosen for the royal French emblem.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A name for species of Iris—the French fleur-de-lis.
  • n. In heraldry, same as fleur-de-lis.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Constantinople and take the Turk by the beard? shall we not? what sayest thou, my fair flower-de-luce?

    The Life of King Henry the Fifth

  • I've got a flower-de-luce in my garden now, from one of the new roots that old Major Seaforth brought over from France, which is just the most beautiful thing you ever did see; and I was thinking, as

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 03, No. 19, May, 1859

  • Shall not thou and I, between Saint Denis and Saint George, compound a boy, half French, half English, that shall go to Constantinople and take the Turk by the beard? shall we not? what sayest thou, my fair flower-de-luce?

    Act V. Scene II. The Life of King Henry the Fifth

  • Dante (Purgatorio, XX, 86) lays more stress on the moral violence, though his words easily convey the notion of physical wrong: "I see the flower-de-luce Anagni enter, and Christ in his own Vicar captive made; I see him yet another time derided; I see renewed the vinegar and gall, and between living thieves I see him slain."

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 2: Assizes-Browne

  • Lilies and the flower-de-luce sprang up in the place of reeds; smilax and poison-oak gave way to the purple-plumed iron-weed and pink spiderwort; the bindweeds ran everywhere blooming as they ran, and on one of the dead cypresses a giant creeper hung its green burden of foliage and lifted its scarlet trumpets.

    Southern Prose and Poetry for Schools

  • We spurn from us with disgust and indignation the slanders of those who bring us their anecdotes with the attestation of the flower-de-luce on their shoulder.

    Paras. 125-149

  • The good woman nearly fell sick at sight of me in this condition; she kept strength enough to dress my wound, and after bathing it well, she applied flower-de-luce macerated in brandy, an excellent remedy much used in our country.

    Rousseau

  • Jim's eyes traveled past her to the garden in the rear of the house, where yellow flower-de-luce was beginning to blow.

    Country Neighbors

  • By gold, wisdom; by the precious stones, discretion; and by the turrets of the flower-de-luce I understand the perfection of virtue.

    The Cell of Self-Knowledge : seven early English mystical treatises printed by Henry Pepwell in 1521

  • In a crown are three things: gold is the first; precious stones are the second; and the turrets of the flower-de-luce, raised up above the head, those are the third.

    The Cell of Self-Knowledge : seven early English mystical treatises printed by Henry Pepwell in 1521

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