Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A ravine.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A ravine. See gill a woody glen.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A false spelling of gill.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The gill (or "ghyll," as the poet writes it), from which the lonely family that dwelt there took their name, was not upon the bridle-road from Scargate Hall toward Middleton, nor even within eye or reach of any road at all; but overlooked by kites alone, and tracked with thoroughfare of nothing but the mountain streamlet.

    Mary Anerley : a Yorkshire Tale

  • You can choose an ascent or a descent, but either way you're guaranteed to get a few gobfuls of ghyll water.

    Just get physical: active days out in Britain

  • Black Force and The Spout are two such sights when in spate, only visible after negotiating a ghyll on the old Westmorland-Yorkshire border as rifted as the Rishi Ganga Gorge in northern India.

    Country diary: Uldale Force

  • Out in the field, the fox, streaming across the ghyll, a blur of red.

    First Blood

  • For in that garth was neither knight nor squire nor sergeant; no spear-head glittered from the wall, no gleam of helm showed from the war-swales; no porter was at the gate; the drawbridge over the deep ghyll was down, the portcullis was up, and the great door cast wide open.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • The gill (or “ghyll,” as the poet writes it), from which the lonely family that dwelt there took their name, was not upon the bridle-road from Scargate Hall toward Middleton, nor even within eye or reach of any road at all; but overlooked by kites alone, and tracked with thoroughfare of nothing but the mountain streamlet.

    Mary Anerley

  • The very spirit of the moorland, lake, brook, tarn, ghyll, and ridge breathes from his prose poetry: and well it might.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 07, No. 43, May, 1861 Creator

  • Nearly at the end of the second run White found himself on the edge of a narrow, deep ghyll, with a stream at the bottom, crossed by an overgrown footpath which went down to the stream and up again by flights of stone steps opposite each other.

    Highways and Byways in Surrey

  • No living creature, great or small, lived in that ghyll.

    A Child's Book of Saints

  • Perhaps it was the stillness or the scent of the firs that climbed the hollow of the ghyll behind the house that reminded Ida of the man who had strolled with her through the shadow of the giant redwoods of the Pacific Slope.

    The Gold Trail

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  • ...an icon edged
    with silver between a blue Victorian
    glass and the ghyll-edge of bed...

    - Peter Reading, Duos, from For the Municipality's Elderly, 1974

    June 22, 2008