Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A simple, usually inexpensive rural vacation retreat especially in France.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of gîte.
  • n. A gown.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A gown.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An obsolete form of gist.
  • n. A gown.

Etymologies

French gîte, lodging, lair, from Old French giste, from feminine past participle of gesir, to lie; see gist.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • First, a week in a 'gite' in the Loire Valley countryside near Angers, relaxing (me) and practising (Tom).

    Archive 2004-09-01

  • This does bring back memories of the European Cup in 2004 when we stayed at a gite in St Didier - a lovely, friendly little Provencal village.

    retirer - French Word-A-Day

  • There was a little covered walkway from the gite to the large but dilapidated dove house with tiles made as you mentioned but along the edge there were marks made (by man) that resembled pigeon footprints.

    l'accent tonique - French Word-A-Day

  • Just a little French oddity I had meant to share with you when I was in Chaunac (Charente Maritime) staying in a small gite.

    l'accent tonique - French Word-A-Day

  • After a few days combing Marrakech's maze-like medina for treasures to take home, you head into the High Atlas mountains near Oukaimeden to go trekking with Berbers for three days, staying in a village gite where you'll take long lunches under the walnut trees.

    Great last-minute summer deals for families

  • This does bring back memories of the European Cup in 2004 when we stayed at a gite in St Didier - a lovely,friendly little Provencal village.

    retirer - French Word-A-Day

  • Just a little French oddity I had meant to share with you when I was in Chaunac Charente Maritime staying in a small gite.

    l'accent tonique - French Word-A-Day

  • There was a little covered walkway from the gite to the large but dilapidated dove house with tiles made as you mentioned but along the edge there were marks made by man that resembled pigeon footprints.

    l'accent tonique - French Word-A-Day

  • And if they grow up to hate camping, they can always go and stay with their grandparents in a gite in a remote corner of France, while I take my tent up a Welsh mountain.

    Archive 2009-05-01

  • It was a good vehicle track from the gite down to La Fouly, passing by a little hydro-electric scheme with a completely flat turquoise reservoir above a tiny dam.

    Day 9 – Trient via the Fenetre d’Arpette

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Comments

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  • I expect to find 'gite' in printed matter, but I prefer to write"gîte", longhand or on the keyboard.

    May 27, 2013

  • You do it the hard way: [ʒiːt].

    December 23, 2008

  • BrainyBabe.... what better use of language is there?!

    December 23, 2008

  • Oh, I forgot: reason C), to demonstrate that one can pronounce French, and that therefore one is a properly brought up middle class person; see Posie Simmonds's modern updating of "Madame Bovary".

    December 23, 2008

  • Thanks for the IPA! How does one do that?

    December 23, 2008

  • Yup: [ʒiːt]. Sadly you don't seem to be able to control the font, so it looks ungainly.

    December 23, 2008

  • A holiday apartment in France, pronounced "jzeet". (Does Wordie support IPA?) The French word is often used by British people, as A) it is several syllables shorter than any reasonable alternative, and B) it handily announces that one is off for a foreign, but relatively carbon-benign, holiday.

    December 23, 2008