MaryW has adopted the words kakistocracy, wonderful, department chair, suffrage, cocker spaniel, quadrennial, monozygotic, and neophilic, looked up 1423 words, created 2 lists, listed 474 words, written 602 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 20 words.

Comments by MaryW

  • In 2010, many major companies filed prepackaged or prearranged bankruptcies rather than conventional ones. A 2011 AlixPartners survey of bankruptcy professionals predicted that more than half of the large company filings over the coming year would be prepacks, and that prepackaged bankruptcy filings would continue in significant numbers in the ensuing years as well.1 For parties seeking to restructure a company quickly, a prepackaged plan of reorganization can be a powerful and effective tool that provides distinct advantages over both a conventional bankruptcy filing and an out-of-court restructuring. Most notably, a prepack may offer a company the fastest route to restructure through bankruptcy and obtain at least some (though not all) of the benefits potentially offered to companies in a conventional bankruptcy under title 11 of the U.S. Code (the Bankruptcy Code).

    Unlike a conventional bankruptcy, in a prepack nearly all negotiation takes place out of the public eye and without the oversight of any bankruptcy court, the Office of the U.S. Trustee or a creditors' committee.

    Paul Basta et al., A Practitioner's Guide to Pre-Packaged Bankruptcy: A Primer (American Bankruptcy Institute), p. 1

    April 19, 2017

  • In 2010, many major companies filed prepackaged or prearranged bankruptcies rather than conventional ones. A 2011 AlixPartners survey of bankruptcy professionals predicted that more than half of the large company filings over the coming year would be prepacks, and that prepackaged bankruptcy filings would continue in significant numbers in the ensuing years as well.1 For parties seeking to restructure a company quickly, a prepackaged plan of reorganization can be a powerful and effective tool that provides distinct advantages over both a conventional bankruptcy filing and an out-of-court restructuring. Most notably, a prepack may offer a company the fastest route to restructure through bankruptcy and obtain at least some (though not all) of the benefits potentially offered to companies in a conventional bankruptcy under title 11 of the U.S. Code (the Bankruptcy Code).

    Unlike a conventional bankruptcy, in a prepack nearly all negotiation takes place out of the public eye and without the oversight of any bankruptcy court, the Office of the U.S. Trustee or a creditors' committee.

    Paul Basta et al., A Practitioner's Guide to Pre-Packaged Bankruptcy: A Primer (American Bankruptcy Institute), p. 1

    April 19, 2017

  • In 2010, many major companies filed prepackaged or prearranged bankruptcies rather than conventional ones. A 2011 AlixPartners survey of bankruptcy professionals predicted that more than half of the large company filings over the coming year would be prepacks, and that prepackaged bankruptcy filings would continue in significant numbers in the ensuing years as well.1 For parties seeking to restructure a company quickly, a prepackaged plan of reorganization can be a powerful and effective tool that provides distinct advantages over both a conventional bankruptcy filing and an out-of-court restructuring. Most notably, a prepack may offer a company the fastest route to restructure through bankruptcy and obtain at least some (though not all) of the benefits potentially offered to companies in a conventional bankruptcy under title 11 of the U.S. Code (the Bankruptcy Code).

    Unlike a conventional bankruptcy, in a prepack nearly all negotiation takes place out of the public eye and without the oversight of any bankruptcy court, the Office of the U.S. Trustee or a creditors' committee.

    Paul Basta et al., A Practitioner's Guide to Pre-Packaged Bankruptcy: A Primer (American Bankruptcy Institute), p. 1

    April 19, 2017

  • In 2010, many major companies filed prepackaged or prearranged bankruptcies rather than conventional ones. A 2011 AlixPartners survey of bankruptcy professionals predicted that more than half of the large company filings over the coming year would be prepacks, and that prepackaged bankruptcy filings would continue in significant numbers in the ensuing years as well.1 For parties seeking to restructure a company quickly, a prepackaged plan of reorganization can be a powerful and effective tool that provides distinct advantages over both a conventional bankruptcy filing and an out-of-court restructuring. Most notably, a prepack may offer a company the fastest route to restructure through bankruptcy and obtain at least some (though not all) of the benefits potentially offered to companies in a conventional bankruptcy under title 11 of the U.S. Code (the Bankruptcy Code).

    Unlike a conventional bankruptcy, in a prepack nearly all negotiation takes place out of the public eye and without the oversight of any bankruptcy court, the Office of the U.S. Trustee or a creditors' committee.

    Paul Basta et al., A Practitioner's Guide to Pre-Packaged Bankruptcy: A Primer (American Bankruptcy Institute), p. 1

    April 19, 2017

  • Every day in this country students come to school without a way to pay for lunch. Right now it's up to the school to decide what happens next.

    Since new legislation out of New Mexico on so-called lunch shaming made headlines, we've heard a lot about how schools react.

    Some provide kids an alternative lunch, like a cold cheese sandwich. Other schools sometimes will provide hot lunch, but require students do chores, have their hand stamped or wear a wristband showing they're behind in payment. And, some schools will deny students lunch all together.

    Megan Kamerick, Schools Will Soon Have To Put In Writing If They 'Lunch Shame', All Things Considered, NPR, April 17, 2017

    April 18, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading. Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading. Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading. Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading. Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood,1 spit mask, mesh hood1 or spit guards1 is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.1

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis1 and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.2

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading.1 Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.1 A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest.1 Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.1

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.3

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading.1 Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • Doctors say parasitic twins — asymmetric conjoined twins in which one depends on the other's bodily functions — are extremely rare. Even more uncommon are parasitic rachipagus twins, twins connected at the spine.
    Lindsey Bever, A 10-month-old girl had a parasitic twin protruding from her back — until surgeons removed it, Wash. Post, March 25, 2017

    March 28, 2017

  • Doctors say parasitic twins — asymmetric conjoined twins in which one depends on the other's bodily functions — are extremely rare. Even more uncommon are parasitic rachipagus twins, twins connected at the spine.
    Lindsey Bever, A 10-month-old girl had a parasitic twin protruding from her back — until surgeons removed it, Wash. Post, March 25, 2017

    March 28, 2017

  • Doctors say parasitic twins — asymmetric conjoined twins in which one depends on the other's bodily functions — are extremely rare. Even more uncommon are parasitic rachipagus twins, twins connected at the spine.
    Lindsey Bever, A 10-month-old girl had a parasitic twin protruding from her back — until surgeons removed it, Wash. Post, March 25, 2017

    March 28, 2017

  • "When he saw me, it wasn’t a traditional handshake,” said Barrett, founder and CEO of the KLEO Community Family Life Center, which sits near the library site. “It was actually a dap, where we shook hands and patted on the back at the same time."

    Wash. Post, March 26, 2017

    March 26, 2017

  • Young adults hold immense potential as they transition from adolescence and dependence to adulthood and self-sufficiency. Unfortunately, young African Americans also struggle under the lack of economic opportunities. Disconnected youth are teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who lack a connection to either the education system or labor force. The rate of disconnected youth is highest among African-American youth at 21.6 percent. In nine metro areas, at least 25 percent of Black youth are disconnected from school and work. Disconnected youth not only face their own economic difficulties, but also pose an economic cost to taxpayers, with one estimate as high as $1.56 trillion for the lifetime of disconnected youth. It is worth noting that it is cheaper to prevent disconnection in the first place through quality preschool and K-12 education.

    Congressional Black Caucus, We Have a Lot to Lose: Solutions to Advance Black Families bin the 21st Century (March 2017), pp. 42-43

    March 25, 2017

  • Young adults hold immense potential as they transition from adolescence and dependence to adulthood and self-sufficiency. Unfortunately, young African Americans also struggle under the lack of economic opportunities. Disconnected youth are teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who lack a connection to either the education system or labor force. The rate of disconnected youth is highest among African-American youth at 21.6 percent. In nine metro areas, at least 25 percent of Black youth are disconnected from school and work. Disconnected youth not only face their own economic difficulties, but also pose an economic cost to taxpayers, with one estimate as high as $1.56 trillion for the lifetime of disconnected youth. It is worth noting that it is cheaper to prevent disconnection in the first place through quality preschool and K-12 education.

    Congressional Black Caucus, We Have a Lot to Lose: Solutions to Advance Black Families bin the 21st Century (March 2017), pp. 42-43

    March 25, 2017

  • Uber, like so many other successful tech companies in 2017, is a “platform business,” one built around matchmaking between vendors and customers. If successful, a platform creates its own marketplace; if extremely successful, it ends up controlling something closer to an entire economy. This is intuitive in a case like eBay, which connects buyers and sellers. Airbnb, too, resembles an age-old form of commerce, connecting property owners with short-term lodgers. TaskRabbit and Fiverr connect contractors with people looking to hire them. Some of the largest platforms are less obviously transactional: Facebook and Google connect advertisers with users, users with one another, software developers with users. But while the transactions that happen on their platforms largely take a different form — taps, shares, ads served and scrolled past — the principles are essentially the same, as are the benefits. These businesses are asset- and employee-light, low on liability and high on upside. They aspire to monopoly, often unapologetically, and have been instrumental in rehabilitating the concept.
    John Herrmann, Platform Companies Are Becoming More Powerful — but What Exactly Do They Want?, N.Y. Times Magazine, March 21, 2017

    March 22, 2017

  • Uber, like so many other successful tech companies in 2017, is a “platform business,” one built around matchmaking between vendors and customers. If successful, a platform creates its own marketplace; if extremely successful, it ends up controlling something closer to an entire economy. This is intuitive in a case like eBay, which connects buyers and sellers. Airbnb, too, resembles an age-old form of commerce, connecting property owners with short-term lodgers. TaskRabbit and Fiverr connect contractors with people looking to hire them. Some of the largest platforms are less obviously transactional: Facebook and Google connect advertisers with users, users with one another, software developers with users. But while the transactions that happen on their platforms largely take a different form — taps, shares, ads served and scrolled past — the principles are essentially the same, as are the benefits. These businesses are asset- and employee-light, low on liability and high on upside. They aspire to monopoly, often unapologetically, and have been instrumental in rehabilitating the concept.
    John Herrmann, Platform Companies Are Becoming More Powerful — but What Exactly Do They Want?, N.Y. Times Magazine, March 21, 2017

    March 22, 2017

  • As an ethologist (a scientist who studies animal behaviour), he's chosen to work with goats because they're neophilic. That is, when presented with a novel situation (like the specially constructed equipment he uses in various experiments), they're less inclined to just ignore the experiment and cower in the corner than, say, sheep. This curiosity makes them interesting from a cognitive point of view and easier to study.
    Thomas Thwaites, GoatMan: How I Took a Holiday from Being Human (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2016), Kindle loc. 1126

    March 6, 2017

  • As an ethologist (a scientist who studies animal behaviour), he's chosen to work with goats because they're neophilic. That is, when presented with a novel situation (like the specially constructed equipment he uses in various experiments), they're less inclined to just ignore the experiment and cower in the corner than, say, sheep. This curiosity makes them interesting from a cognitive point of view and easier to study.
    Thomas Thwaites, GoatMan: How I Took a Holiday from Being Human (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2016), Kindle loc. 1126

    March 6, 2017

  • 1. The director or chair of a department (including departmental-level programs) is responsible to the dean of a school or college for the educational and administrative affairs of the department. In administrative matters, the director or chair:

    A. Is the representative, through the dean, of the President and also of the department faculty, and

    B. Is responsible for observance of the policies of the University by the department.

    2. The director or chair shall preside at the meetings of the department.

    3. In accord with established procedures, . . . the director or chair:

    A. Prepares and transmits to the dean the recommendations of the department, and any separate recommendations, upon matters of personnel and budget;

    B. Evaluates the educational activities of the department, formulates plans for its future development, and transmits these evaluations and plans to the dean for appropriate action; and

    C. Keeps the dean informed of all departmental matters of concern to the college or school.

    . . .

    Univ. of Washington Executive Order No. I (May 31, 1956; Feb. 21, 1978)

    February 27, 2017

  • Centuries ago, Japan created a word called ubasute. Translated as "granny dumping," it described the practice of poor citizens bringing their senile elders to mountaintops because they can no longer afford their care.

    Today, amid Japan's widespread demographic and economic woes, ubasute is making a comeback.

    Modern-day granny dumping doesn't involve hauling seniors up the sides of mountains, but driving them to hospitals or the offices of nearby charities and, essentially, giving them up for adoption.

    Chris Weller, people who can't afford elder care are reviving a practice known as 'granny dumping', Business Insider, Jan. 30, 2017

    February 7, 2017

  • “We've had the safety net programs a lot longer than we've had the term,” says Guian McKee, a historian at the University of Virginia.

    McKee trawled through newspaper archives to see when the phrase “safety net” first started showing up to describe government social programs. The first reference he could find was in 1966, in a New York Times article about the New York Governor’s race. One of the candidates used the phrase to describe his approach to social spending, saying “public assistance will be envisaged as a safety net on the one hand, and as a transmission belt to productive employment on the other.”

    Ironically, the candidate who said it was Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr., FDR’s son.

    But the “safety net” still didn't really become a household term in the way we know it now, for another fifteen years.

    February 18, 1981 to be exact, in President Ronald Reagan's first speech to Congress. He was in the midst of laying out big and controversial federal spending cuts he wanted to make,

    * * *

    “All those with true need can rest assured that the social safety net of programs they depend on are exempt from any cuts,” he said. Then he went on, “But government will not continue to subsidize individuals or business interests where real need cannot be demonstrated.”

    And in those two sentences, Reagan popularized a vivid metaphor for government assistance, while at the same time redefining who deserved it.

    Krissy Clark, How did the social safety net get its name?, Marketplace, April 2, 2013.

    January 29, 2017

  • “We've had the safety net programs a lot longer than we've had the term,” says Guian McKee, a historian at the University of Virginia.

    McKee trawled through newspaper archives to see when the phrase “safety net” first started showing up to describe government social programs. The first reference he could find was in 1966, in a New York Times article about the New York Governor’s race. One of the candidates used the phrase to describe his approach to social spending, saying “public assistance will be envisaged as a safety net on the one hand, and as a transmission belt to productive employment on the other.”

    Ironically, the candidate who said it was Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr., FDR’s son.

    But the “safety net” still didn't really become a household term in the way we know it now, for another fifteen years.

    February 18, 1981 to be exact, in President Ronald Reagan's first speech to Congress. He was in the midst of laying out big and controversial federal spending cuts he wanted to make,

    * * *

    “All those with true need can rest assured that the social safety net of programs they depend on are exempt from any cuts,” he said. Then he went on, “But government will not continue to subsidize individuals or business interests where real need cannot be demonstrated.”

    And in those two sentences, Reagan popularized a vivid metaphor for government assistance, while at the same time redefining who deserved it.

    Krissy Clark, How did the social safety net get its name?, Marketplace, April 2, 2013.

    January 29, 2017

  • GoFundMe is filled with people desperately seeking money to bury their dead. In England, this is called funeral poverty and it’s agonizing.
    Brooke Gladstone, "Busted" #4: When the Safety Net Doesn't Catch You, Jan. 17, 2017

    January 29, 2017

  • We’ve used this phrase so many times in the past two months that it’s almost lost meaning — partly because it can mean so many different things. Depending on who you talk to, “fake news" may refer to satirical news, hoaxes, news that’s clumsily framed or outright wrong, propaganda, lies destined for viral clicks and advertising dollars, politically motivated half-truths, and more.
    Brooke Borel, Fact-Checking Won’t Save Us From Fake News, FiveThirtyEight, Jan. 4, 2017

    January 6, 2017

  • As a point of clarification, it should be noted that this article is about “leximetrics” and not “econometrics”. “Leximetrics” can be understood as every quantitative measurement of law. To be sure, the coding of shareholder rights can be the first part of an econometric study which seeks to find correlations between legal and economic data. Since this will, however, be part of a further study,6 this article analyses only the quantification of the law on shareholder protection in different countries.
    Lele, Priya and Siems, Mathias M., Shareholder Protection: A Leximetric Approach. University of Cambridge, CBR Working Paper No 324. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=897479

    January 5, 2017

  • Street Theatre or the Nukkad Natak, as it is locally known, is perhaps India’s most ancient form of entertainment. Since time immemorial, we’ve had motley crowds of people gathered around street performers at the street corner. Street theatre is perhaps the most effective way to combine live action before a live audience, and get instantaneous responses.

    It is not without reason that the Nukkad Natak is used far and wide to spread awareness on social issues. For how else can conscious citizens voice matters to their friends?

    Yet, the Nukkad Natak also offers avenues for wholesome entertainment. It combines group performances with live acting and hearty song-and-dance sequences.Little wonder then, that an enthralled audience often bursts into a round of applause right in the middle of the street!

    Street Plays in India: An Introduction to the 'Nukkad Natak', Everybody Plays (July 28, 2012)

    I looked this up after reading:

    The Centre will be regularly uploading videos in the form of skits, plays and nukkad nataks to be performed by the students of the Institute of Law, Nirma University so that it could sensitize the audience and be understood by a larger audience and they may share and forward this as media for spreading awareness in the different sections of the society.

    Nirma University Institute of Law, Centre for Law & Governance

    December 30, 2016

  • On 26 January 1662, Samuel Pepys is thankful that he has kept his resolve with a seventeenth century dry January. If the old ones really are the best, why not follow in his footsteps and participate in a January dryathlon?
    9 Literary New Year's Resolutions OUPblog, Dec. 29, 2016

    December 29, 2016

  • See data integrity.

    December 29, 2016

  • <b>Data integrity</b>/security is the quality or condition of being accurate, complete and valid, and not altered or destroyed in an unauthorized manner.
    Boston College Internal Audit Dept., Data Integrity and Security page

    December 29, 2016

  • Data Analysis is the process of systematically applying statistical and/or logical techniques to describe and illustrate, condense and recap, and evaluate data. According to Shamoo and Resnik (2003) various analytic procedures “provide a way of drawing inductive inferences from data and distinguishing the signal (the phenomenon of interest) from the noise (statistical fluctuations) present in the data”..

    While data analysis in qualitative research can include statistical procedures, many times analysis becomes an ongoing iterative process where data is continuously collected and analyzed almost simultaneously. Indeed, researchers generally analyze for patterns in observations through the entire data collection phase (Savenye, Robinson, 2004). The form of the analysis is determined by the specific qualitative approach taken (field study, ethnography content analysis, oral history, biography, unobtrusive research) and the form of the data (field notes, documents, audiotape, videotape).

    An essential component of ensuring data integrity is the accurate and appropriate analysis of research findings. Improper statistical analyses distort scientific findings, mislead casual readers (Shepard, 2002), and may negatively influence the public perception of research. Integrity issues are just as relevant to analysis of non-statistical data as well.

    Northern Illinois University, Faculty Development & Instructional Design Center, Data Analysis

    December 29, 2016

  • Big Data is an umbrella term for a variety of strategies and tactics that involve massive data sets, and technologies that make sense out of these mindboggling reams of data. The Big Data trend has impacted all industries, including the media industry, as new technologies are being developed to automate and simplify the process of data analysis, and as throngs of data analysts are being trained and hired to meet the demand for the analysis of these data.
    Martha L. Stone, Big Data for Media (Nov. 2014) (Univ. of Oxford Reuters Inst. for the Study of Journalism)

    See data journalism.

    December 29, 2016

  • See data journalism.

    December 29, 2016

  • See data journalism.

    December 29, 2016

  • See data journalism.

    December 29, 2016

  • Journalism in the 21st century involves finding, collecting, analyzing and visualizing data for stories. The Journalism School offers foundational courses in data‐driven journalism as well as a two‐semester specialization in data journalism for students interested in advanced skills.
    Columbia Journalism School, Data page

    December 29, 2016

  • What is data journalism? I could answer, simply, that it is journalism done with data. But that doesn’t help much.

    Both ‘data’ and ‘journalism’ are troublesome terms. Some people think of ‘data’ as any collection of numbers, most likely gathered on a spreadsheet. 20 years ago, that was pretty much the only sort of data that journalists dealt with. But we live in a digital world now, a world in which almost anything can be — and almost everything is — described with numbers.

    . . .

    What makes data journalism different to the rest of journalism? Perhaps it is the new possibilities that open up when you combine the traditional ‘nose for news’ and ability to tell a compelling story, with the sheer scale and range of digital information now available.

    And those possibilities can come at any stage of the journalist’s process: using programming to automate the process of gathering and combining information from local government, police, and other civic sources . . . .

    Or using software to find connections between hundreds of thousands of documents . . . .

    Data journalism can help a journalist tell a complex story through engaging infographics. . . . .

    Or it can help explain how a story relates to an individual . . . .

    Data can be the source of data journalism, or it can be the tool with which the story is told — or it can be both. Like any source, it should be treated with scepticism; and like any tool, we should be conscious of how it can shape and restrict the stories that are created with it.

    Paul Bradshaw,

    December 29, 2016

  • Data journalism is not graphics and visualisations. It's about telling the story in the best way possible. Sometimes that will be a visualisation or a map . . . .

    But sometimes it's a news story. Sometimes, just publishing the number is enough.

    If data journalism is about anything, it's the flexibility to search for new ways of storytelling. And more and more reporters are realising that. Suddenly, we have company - and competition. So being a data journalist is no longer unusual.

    It's just journalism.

    Simon Rogers Data journalism at the Guardian: what is it and how do we do it? (July 28, 2011)

    December 29, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    5. Institutional channel. The previous four channels are geared almost exclusively toward retail or mass affluent investors with less than US$10m in net investable assets. In contrast, the institutional channel includes businesses, such as the treasury department of a corporation as well as insurance companies,

    endowments, private family offices, defined benefit pension plans, foundations and universities. The key driver to success in institutional distribution — apart from demonstrating proven performance results — is building solid relationships with the institutions’ designated investment consultants. Because they act as vigilant gate-keepers and decision-makers in allocating assets among different managers, it is essential to win their

    hearts and minds.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 8

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    4. Supermarket platform channel. The supermarket channel is made up of discount brokers that offer mutual funds from a large number of fund sponsors. This channel includes many no-advice discount brokers that operate almost exclusively online. The most important feature of a fund supermarket is its no-transaction-fee (NTF) program whereby an investor may purchase funds from a wide range of fund companies with no transaction fees. The NTF offerings from a discount broker often number in the thousands, providing an investor the convenience of purchasing no-load funds available from different manufacturers through a single, user-friendly platform. Although initially categorized as a low-margin, no-frills, bare-bones business model targeted at cost-conscious consumers, many of these supermarkets have beefed up

    their client services by offering comprehensive investor education material; a wide selection of financial research; and sophisticated, yet user-friendly, online and mobile tech applications. While the asset manager must pay fees to the distributor for a fund to be listed on a platform, given that most of these platforms operate under a high-volume, low-cost model, the fees are usually lower than the revenue-sharing agreements prevalent in the professional advice channel. However, the old adage “you get what you pay for” applies

    here: the product line from one manager will be thrown into a vast ocean of thousands of different products from dozens, if not hundreds, of other asset management firms — with no dedicated sales support.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    4. Supermarket platform channel. The supermarket channel is made up of discount brokers that offer mutual funds from a large number of fund sponsors. This channel includes many no-advice discount brokers that operate almost exclusively online. The most important feature of a fund supermarket is its no-transaction-fee (NTF) program whereby an investor may purchase funds from a wide range of fund companies with no transaction fees. The NTF offerings from a discount broker often number in the thousands, providing an investor the convenience of purchasing no-load funds available from different manufacturers through a single, user-friendly platform. Although initially categorized as a low-margin, no-frills, bare-bones business model targeted at cost-conscious consumers, many of these supermarkets have beefed up

    their client services by offering comprehensive investor education material; a wide selection of financial research; and sophisticated, yet user-friendly, online and mobile tech applications. While the asset manager must pay fees to the distributor for a fund to be listed on a platform, given that most of these platforms operate under a high-volume, low-cost model, the fees are usually lower than the revenue-sharing agreements prevalent in the professional advice channel. However, the old adage “you get what you pay for” applies

    here: the product line from one manager will be thrown into a vast ocean of thousands of different products from dozens, if not hundreds, of other asset management firms — with no dedicated sales support.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    4. Supermarket platform channel. The supermarket channel is made up of discount brokers that offer mutual funds from a large number of fund sponsors. This channel includes many no-advice discount brokers that operate almost exclusively online. The most important feature of a fund supermarket is its no-transaction-fee (NTF) program whereby an investor may purchase funds from a wide range of fund companies with no transaction fees. The NTF offerings from a discount broker often number in the thousands, providing an investor the convenience of purchasing no-load funds available from different manufacturers through a single, user-friendly platform. Although initially categorized as a low-margin, no-frills, bare-bones business model targeted at cost-conscious consumers, many of these supermarkets have beefed up

    their client services by offering comprehensive investor education material; a wide selection of financial research; and sophisticated, yet user-friendly, online and mobile tech applications. While the asset manager must pay fees to the distributor for a fund to be listed on a platform, given that most of these platforms operate under a high-volume, low-cost model, the fees are usually lower than the revenue-sharing agreements prevalent in the professional advice channel. However, the old adage “you get what you pay for” applies

    here: the product line from one manager will be thrown into a vast ocean of thousands of different products from dozens, if not hundreds, of other asset management firms — with no dedicated sales support.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    4. Supermarket platform channel. The supermarket channel is made up of discount brokers that offer mutual funds from a large number of fund sponsors. This channel includes many no-advice discount brokers that operate almost exclusively online. The most important feature of a fund supermarket is its no-transaction-fee (NTF) program whereby an investor may purchase funds from a wide range of fund companies with no transaction fees. The NTF offerings from a discount broker often number in the thousands, providing an investor the convenience of purchasing no-load funds available from different manufacturers through a single, user-friendly platform. Although initially categorized as a low-margin, no-frills, bare-bones business model targeted at cost-conscious consumers, many of these supermarkets have beefed up

    their client services by offering comprehensive investor education material; a wide selection of financial research; and sophisticated, yet user-friendly, online and mobile tech applications. While the asset manager must pay fees to the distributor for a fund to be listed on a platform, given that most of these platforms operate under a high-volume, low-cost model, the fees are usually lower than the revenue-sharing agreements prevalent in the professional advice channel. However, the old adage “you get what you pay for” applies

    here: the product line from one manager will be thrown into a vast ocean of thousands of different products from dozens, if not hundreds, of other asset management firms — with no dedicated sales support.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    3. Retirement plan channel. This is the largest channel and includes primarily corporate 401(k) retirement plans in which beneficiaries choose from a menu of investment product options. With the decline of defined benefit plans in the US, 72% of American households own funds distributed through employer-sponsored retirement plans. Employers sponsoring defined contribution plans rely upon third parties to administer the plans and provide investment options to employees. Third-party administrators (TPAs) effectively act as the outsourced client interface for the fund manager and handle a wide variety of administrative services. As with the case of most distribution channels, because the TPA acts as the interface between client and manufacturer, the manufacturer here is left with limited to zero direct client relationship and limited brand identity.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    2. Professional advice channel. In 2012 53% of households owning investment products purchased them through the professional investment advice channel. This includes a very

    broad range of professionals operating under many different titles: financial advisors, private bankers, registered investment advisors, full-service brokers, independent financial planners, investment service representatives of banks and savings institutions, insurance agents and accountants. The most important feature of this channel is the provision of high value-added services to the end client, “high touch” personalization

    and ongoing customized assistance that may include retirement planning, insurance, lending and liquidity solutions, such as secured loans and jumbo mortgages, and even succession planning and tax advice. Most distribution through this channel will require a revenue-sharing agreement where the manager pays a portion of their management fees to the distributor — fees that effectively reduce the manager’s bottom line. While this channel may be the costliest route for asset managers, given that managers usually have limited, if any,

    direct client relationships, it is arguably the most viable channel for successful distribution, particularly for smaller firms that lack the resources to build a national sales network.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5-6

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    1. Direct channel. This channel offers a direct commercial relationship between manufacturer and end client, representing full disintermediataion of the traditional distributor. . . . Fewer than 30% of households in the US that owned funds over the last decade owned funds purchased through the direct market channel.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), p. 5

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    1. Direct channel. This channel offers a direct commercial relationship between manufacturer and end client, representing full disintermediataion of the traditional distributor. . . . Fewer than 30% of households in the US that owned funds over the last decade owned funds purchased through the direct market channel.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), p. 5

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.
    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), p. 5

    December 28, 2016

  • And while I agree that one should own a mix of stocks and bonds, I fear many investors, particularly individuals, are being goaded to misdiversify, resulting in higher investment fees, mediocre performance and potentially more risk.
    Kenneth G. Winans, 5 Big Mistakes Investors Make When They Diversify, Forbes (Feb. 5, 2015)

    December 28, 2016

  • "UPREITs" (Umbrella Partnership Real Estate Investment Trusts) are a derivation of the basic REIT structure. They are essentially a combination of a REIT and a partnership. The joining of these two entities allows investors and property contributors not only to enjoy the advantages the basic REIT structure offers, but also to realize additional tax advantages not found in the basic REIT structure. Because of these added benefits, most REITs are now grouped with related partnerships and are organized as UPREITs.

    Chadwick M. Cornell, Comment, REITs and UPREITs: Pushing the Corporate Law Envelope, 145 U. Pa. L. Rev. 1565, 1566 n.6 (1997)

    December 28, 2016

  • "UPREITs" (Umbrella Partnership Real Estate Investment Trusts) are a derivation of the basic REIT structure. They are essentially a combination of a REIT and a partnership. The joining of these two entities allows investors and property contributors not only to enjoy the advantages the basic REIT structure offers, but also to realize additional tax advantages not found in the basic REIT structure. Because of these added benefits, most REITs are now grouped with related partnerships and are organized as UPREITs.

    Chadwick M. Cornell, Comment, REITs and UPREITs: Pushing the Corporate Law Envelope, 145 U. Pa. L. Rev. 1565, 1566 n.6 (1997)

    December 28, 2016

  • Earthquake-induced soil liquefaction (liquefaction) is a leading cause of earthquake damage worldwide. Liquefaction is often described in the literature as the phenomena of seismic generation of excess porewater pressures and consequent softening of granular soils. Many regions in the United States have been witness to liquefaction and its consequences, not just those in the west that people associate with earthquake hazards.
    National Academies Press, State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences (2016)

    December 27, 2016

  • Earthquake-induced soil liquefaction (liquefaction) is a leading cause of earthquake damage worldwide. Liquefaction is often described in the literature as the phenomena of seismic generation of excess porewater pressures and consequent softening of granular soils. Many regions in the United States have been witness to liquefaction and its consequences, not just those in the west that people associate with earthquake hazards.
    National Academies Press, State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences (2016)

    December 27, 2016

  • Intuition is often called a "gut feeling." Sometimes we get a "vibe" when we sense a physical feeling of knowing . . . . The neuroscientist Antonio Damarion calls this the somatic marker: it indicates the way emotions affect reasoning in a rapid and often unconscious way.
    Bruce M. Hood, The Science of Superstition: How the Developing Brain Creates Supernatural Beliefs (New York: HarperCollins, 2009), p. 26 (former title: SuperSense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable)

    December 26, 2016

  • Social psychologists have shown that, with the barest information, people can make judgments about others rapidly and effortlessly. And yet such fleeting impressions, or thin slicing, as it is known, can have a profound effect on our decisions. . . . Humans are exquisitely sensitive to judging others, even though we are often unable to say exactly what it is about them we are noticing.
    Bruce M. Hood, The Science of Superstition: How the Developing Brain Creates Supernatural Beliefs (New York: HarperCollins, 2009), p. 25 (former title: SuperSense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable)

    December 26, 2016

  • In academic social psychology, "social glue" is the term to describe the mechanisms for the social connectedness of a group. Any behavior that causes members of a group to feel more connected can operate as social glue.
    Bruce M. Hood, The Science of Superstition: How the Developing Brain Creates Supernatural Beliefs (New York: HarperCollins, 2009), p. 23 (former title: SuperSense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable)

    December 26, 2016

  • Every year when I monitor exams I see a number of intelligent young adults engaging in routines . . . or producing a multitude of lucky charms and "gonks" (soft toys) that they believe will improve their performance.
    Bruce M. Hood, The Science of Superstition: How the Developing Brain Creates Supernatural Beliefs (New York: HarperCollins, 2009), p. 15 (former title: SuperSense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable)

    December 26, 2016

  • Mind design is the reason why certain ideas are obvious while others are obscure. By mind design I mean the organized way in which our brains are configured to understand and interpret the world. The brain, like very other part of the human body, has evolved over millions of years. . . . your brain has been designed in certain ways through the process of evolution. Most scientists agree that the brain has many specialized, built-in mechanisms that equip us to process the world of experience. These mechanisms are not learned or taught by others. They form the package of mental tools that each of us is equipped with as part of our mind design. But this design does not need a designer. . . . Natural selection is our designer.
    Bruce M. Hood, The Science of Superstition: How the Developing Brain Creates Supernatural Beliefs (New York: HarperCollins, 2009), p. 9 (former title: SuperSense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable)

    December 26, 2016

  • Many highly educated and intelligent individuals experience a powerful sense that there are patterns, forces, energies, and entitities operating in the world that are denied by science because they go beyond the boundaries of natural phenomena we currently understand. More importantly, such experiences are not substantiated by a body of reliable evidence, which is why they are supernatural and unscientific. The inclination or sense that they may be real is our supersense.
    Bruce M. Hood, The Science of Superstition: How the Developing Brain Creates Supernatural Beliefs (New York: HarperCollins, 2009), Prologue (former title: SuperSense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable)

    December 26, 2016

  • Perlegen was now in a position to design a DNA chip with several hundred thousand markers and begin to do genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These are essentially very dense case-control studies designed to find DNA markers important in disease. By typing the same set of markers in large numbers of cases and controls, it becomes a brute-force statistical matter of finding markers that pop up more frequently in sick people than in healthy ones. Those markers are very likely to be in or near genes that play a role in disease.

    GWAS studies have since become ho-hum. But only a few years ago, they were the new new thing.

    Misha Angrist, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 4 (Kindle loc. 1046)

    December 17, 2016

  • Perlegen was now in a position to design a DNA chip with several hundred thousand markers and begin to do genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These are essentially very dense case-control studies designed to find DNA markers important in disease. By typing the same set of markers in large numbers of cases and controls, it becomes a brute-force statistical matter of finding markers that pop up more frequently in sick people than in healthy ones. Those markers are very likely to be in or near genes that play a role in disease.

    GWAS studies have since become ho-hum. But only a few years ago, they were the new new thing.

    Misha Angrist, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 4 (Kindle loc. 1046)

    December 17, 2016

  • If your genome Is all 6 billion DNA base pairs (the function of most of which we don't understand), and your exome is the 20,000+ genes (about 60 million base pairs) that code for protein, then your variome is a smaller subset still: it is an assortment of markers more or less evenly spaced across the genome that tend to vary from person to person; some markers fall within genes, but most do not. By early 2010 researchers had identified nearly 13 million of these markers; . . . . These marker sets (called single nucleotide polymorphism, or SNPs—"snips") were thought to capture much of the variation in human DNA, although they represented no more than 0.05 percent of the entire genome.
    Misha Angrist, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 4 (Kindle loc. 1000)

    December 17, 2016

  • If your genome Is all 6 billion DNA base pairs (the function of most of which we don't understand), and your exome is the 20,000+ genes (about 60 million base pairs) that code for protein, then your variome is a smaller subset still: it is an assortment of markers more or less evenly spaced across the genome that tend to vary from person to person; some markers fall within genes, but most do not. By early 2010 researchers had identified nearly 13 million of these markers; . . . . These marker sets (called single nucleotide polymorphism, or SNPs—"snips") were thought to capture much of the variation in human DNA, although they represented no more than 0.05 percent of the entire genome.
    Misha Angrist, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 4 (Kindle loc. 1000)

    December 17, 2016

  • If your genome Is all 6 billion DNA base pairs (the function of most of which we don't understand), and your exome is the 20,000+ genes (about 60 million base pairs) that code for protein, then your variome is a smaller subset still: it is an assortment of markers more or less evenly spaced across the genome that tend to vary from person to person; some markers fall within genes, but most do not. By early 2010 researchers had identified nearly 13 million of these markers; . . . . These marker sets (called single nucleotide polymorphism, or SNPs—"snips") were thought to capture much of the variation in human DNA, although they represented no more than 0.05 percent of the entire genome.
    Misha Angrist, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 4 (Kindle loc. 1000)

    December 17, 2016

  • After all those years of graduate school and all those thousands of DNA samples I'd aliquotted into tiny polypropylene tubes, I might understand something about myself at the molecular level.
    Misha Angrist, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 3 (Kindle loc. 567)

    December 17, 2016

  • In 2007 (George Church) told me he expected that soon his lab would be able to use the Polonator to sequence the entire human exome, that is, the protein-coding 1 percent of the human genome, for as little as a thousand dollars.
    Misha Angrist, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 2 (Kindle loc. 342)

    December 17, 2016

  • Over the last few years, much of his lab's attention has been on polymerase colonies, or "polonies," a method that uses enzymes to amplify billions of short DNA fragments and stitch those together into a form that can be sequenced. Polony technology has since been licensed to several companies. . . . Church has teamed up with an engineering firm to make and sell a polony sequencer ("the Polonator") . . . .
    Misha Angrist, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 2 (Kindle loc. 334)

    December 17, 2016

  • The restrooms . . . are identified by the male and female karyotypes XY and XX chromosomes, respectively.
    Misha Angrist, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 2 (Kindle loc. 262)

    December 17, 2016

  • here was a genetic disease that was actually treatable or, as personal genomics partisans like to say, "actionable."
    Misha Angrist, Here Is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), ch. 1 (Kindle loc. 121)

    December 17, 2016

  • In contrast, Jonathan Arac, a modem scholar and critic, characterizes the heightened praise given to the novel as hypercanonicity, meaning the book's lofty place in the canon reflects an exaggerated statement about its literary value. He states, "hypercanonization involved teaching students to appreciate Huckleberry Finn in ways that it had never been appreciated before."

    Sharon E. Rush, Emotional Segregation: Huckleberry Finn in the Modern Classroom, 36 U. Mich. J.L. Reform 305, 341 (2003) (citing Jonathan Arac, Huckleberry Finn as Tool and Target: The Functions of Criticism in Our Time at 6 (1997))

    November 23, 2016

  • <blockquote>In contrast, Jonathan Arac, a modem scholar and critic, characterizes the heightened praise given to the novel as <b>hypercanonicity</b>, meaning the book's lofty place in the canon reflects an exaggerated statement about its literary value. He states, "<b>hypercanonization</b> involved teaching students to appreciate Huckleberry Finn in ways that it had never been appreciated before."</blockquote>
    Sharon E. Rush, Emotional Segregation: Huckleberry Finn in the Modern Classroom, 36 U. Mich. J.L. Reform 305, 341 (2003) (citing Jonathan Arac, Huckleberry Finn as Tool and Target: The Functions of Criticism in Our Time at 6 (1997))

    November 23, 2016

  • In contrast, Jonathan Arac, a modem scholar and critic, characterizes the heightened praise given to the novel as hypercanonicity, meaning the book's lofty place in the canon reflects
    an exaggerated statement about its literary value. He states, "hypercanonization involved teaching students to appreciate Huckleberry Finn in ways that it had never been appreciated before."
    Sharon E. Rush, Emotional Segregation: Huckleberry Finn in the Modern Classroom, 36 U. Mich. J.L. Reform 305, 341 (2003) (citing Jonathan Arac, Huckleberry Finn as Tool and Target: The Functions of Criticism in Our Time</i> at 6 (1997))

    November 23, 2016

  • Redistricting can have considerable electoral consequences because it undermines the incumbency advantage. Numerous voters are drawn into districts with a different incumbent seeking reelection. With regard to vote choice, these redrawn constituents rely more on their partisanship and prevailing political conditions because they lack familiarity with their new representative. Macropartisanship, the aggregate party identification of the electorate, is an excellent barometer of the political climate and hence the partisan direction guiding voters. Because redrawn constituents have at best a tenuous bond with their new incumbent, partisan tides have more influence on their vote choice.
    Seth C. McKee, Political Conditions and the Electoral Effects of Redistricting, American Politics Research, vol. 40, p. 623 (abstract) (2013)

    October 17, 2016

  • As a sociolinguist, I study the science of language in its social context. I began my lecture by describing the different ways that linguists subcategorize languages. Dialects, which most people are familiar with, are regional varieties of a language, like Texan or Midwestern English. But there are also ethnolects, associated with specific ethnic groups, like Chicano and Jewish English, and genderlects which refer to the distinctive ways that women and men talk.

    An idiolect is not the language of idiots, but an idiosyncratic form of language that is unique to an individual. No two individuals—not even family members living under the same roof—speak the exact same language. We all pronounce words slightly differently, have different inflections in our voices, and choose different words to refer to the same thing.

    Jennifer Sclafani, The Idolect of Donald Trump, Scientific American Mind blog, March 16, 2016

    October 10, 2016

  • As a sociolinguist, I study the science of language in its social context. I began my lecture by describing the different ways that linguists subcategorize languages. Dialects, which most people are familiar with, are regional varieties of a language, like Texan or Midwestern English. But there are also ethnolects, associated with specific ethnic groups, like Chicano and Jewish English, and genderlects which refer to the distinctive ways that women and men talk.

    An idiolect is not the language of idiots, but an idiosyncratic form of language that is unique to an individual. No two individuals—not even family members living under the same roof—speak the exact same language. We all pronounce words slightly differently, have different inflections in our voices, and choose different words to refer to the same thing.

    Jennifer Sclafani, The Idolect of Donald Trump, Scientific American Mind blog, March 16, 2016

    October 10, 2016

  • As a sociolinguist, I study the science of language in its social context. I began my lecture by describing the different ways that linguists subcategorize languages. Dialects, which most people are familiar with, are regional varieties of a language, like Texan or Midwestern English. But there are also ethnolects, associated with specific ethnic groups, like Chicano and Jewish English, and genderlects which refer to the distinctive ways that women and men talk.

    An idiolect is not the language of idiots, but an idiosyncratic form of language that is unique to an individual. No two individuals—not even family members living under the same roof—speak the exact same language. We all pronounce words slightly differently, have different inflections in our voices, and choose different words to refer to the same thing.

    Jennifer Sclafani, The Idolect of Donald Trump, Scientific American Mind blog, March 16, 2016

    October 10, 2016

  • As a sociolinguist, I study the science of language in its social context. I began my lecture by describing the different ways that linguists subcategorize languages. Dialects, which most people are familiar with, are regional varieties of a language, like Texan or Midwestern English. But there are also ethnolects, associated with specific ethnic groups, like Chicano and Jewish English, and genderlects which refer to the distinctive ways that women and men talk.

    An idiolect is not the language of idiots, but an idiosyncratic form of language that is unique to an individual. No two individuals—not even family members living under the same roof—speak the exact same language. We all pronounce words slightly differently, have different inflections in our voices, and choose different words to refer to the same thing.

    Jennifer Sclafani, The Idolect of Donald Trump, Scientific American Mind blog, March 16, 2016

    October 10, 2016

  • Yoshinori Ohsumi of the Tokyo Institute of Technology has won the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discoveries about "autophagy" — a fundamental process cells use to degrade and recycle parts of themselves.

    . . .

    Ohsumi's work opened the path to understanding how cells adapt to starvation and respond to infection, according to statement from the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute.

    Mutations in the genes that control autophagy can lead to a variety of conditions, including cancer, type 2 diabetes and neurological diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimers, according to the announcement.

    Autophagy, a term that comes from Greek words for "self-eating," is a basic process cells need to function properly.

    "Without autophagy, our cells won't survive," says Juleen Zierath, who chaired the committee that selected Ohsumi. "We need autophagy to ward off invading molecules, for example, to deal with very large proteins that might be long-lived or defective. But we also need autophagy for renewal."

    ...

    Before Ohsumi's work, scientists knew there was a structure inside cells that was considered the equivalent of a "waste dump," Zierath says.

    "What he showed was that it wasn't a waste dump. It was a recycling plant. This was a really sophisticated machinery that recycled damaged or long-lived proteins," Zierath says.

    Japanese Biologist Wins Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine, NPR Morning Edition, Oct. 3, 2016

    October 4, 2016

  • the weather events of this time have a very high degree of improbability. Indeed, it has even been proposed that this era be named the "catastrophozoic." (Others prefer such phrases as "the long emergency" and "the Penumbral Period.")
    Amitav Ghosh, "Writing the Unimaginable," American Scholar, Autumn 2016, p. 52

    October 1, 2016

  • the weather events of this time have a very high degree of improbability. Indeed, it has even been proposed that this era be named the "catastrophozoic." (Others prefer such phrases as "the long emergency" and "the Penumbral Period.")
    Amitav Ghosh, "Writing the Unimaginable," American Scholar, Autumn 2016, p. 52

    October 1, 2016

  • the weather events of this time have a very high degree of improbability. Indeed, it has even been proposed that this era be named the "catastrophozoic." (Others prefer such phrases as "the long emergency" and "the Penumbral Period.")
    Amitav Ghosh, "Writing the Unimaginable," American Scholar, Autumn 2016, p. 52

    October 1, 2016

  • Designer Niels Schrader was pleased that PostNL shared his idea of the book landscape. “In this design, the books are spread out horizontally, photographed from different angles. For example, there are photographs of books which are open, or with the front or back cover showing, or only the spine of the book. This creates a landscape of books if you view them from above. We now call that a bookscape,” says Schrader.

    Year of the Book honoured with book landscape on postage stamps

    , Koninklijke Bibliotek, Sept. 2, 2016

    September 7, 2016

  • A musician who plays tango.

    From context, in Carolina de Robertis, The Gods of Tango (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2015)

    September 4, 2016

  • From a novel set (mostly) in Buenos Aires in 1913-1920:

    Uncle Palo . . . played candombe—three drums of different sizes locking rhythms to form a complex throbbing whole . . . .
    Carolina de Robertis, The Gods of Tango (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2015), p. 283

    September 4, 2016

  • From a novel set (mostly) in Buenos Aires in 1913-1920:

    Their dancing was just as prim: their feet dutifully stepped back or to the side in response to the man's moves, but rarely attempted a gancho, rarely slid a calf between a man's legs—an unseemly act—and even when they did it was a quick and timid motion, obscured by floor-length skirts.
    Carolina de Robertis, The Gods of Tango (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2015), p. 215

    September 4, 2016

  • From a novel set (mostly) in Buenos Aires in 1913-1920:

    How much had changed since . . . those days when the tango was fresh and young and had a percussive drive and vibrancy, before it passed through the hands of hordes of immigrants, before it got slowed down by the bandoneón and the spirit of lament. The bandoneón, that boxy German instrument, accordion-like, made for voluptuous mourning.
    Carolina de Robertis, The Gods of Tango (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2015), p. 116

    September 4, 2016

  • From a novel set (mostly) in Buenos Aires in 1913-1920:, this is a flashback to, probably late 19th century:

    in Buenos Aires . . . music rapped and hummed on every corner . . . payadas, sung by pairs of country men who knew the life of gauchos and horses and lassos and dirt, who battled each other through song, . . .; habaneras, sparked by sailors freshly arrived from Cuba . . .; milongas, those fast joyful songs that could fill a filthy alley with dancers more quickly than honey could draw flies; and candombe, the music of black people whose ancestors had come in ships from Africa, shackled, enslaved, and who now lived among the immigrants, . . . with the most incredible music, . . . music played on drums built with cast-off barrels, whose rhythms interlocked to form a tight vast sound. There was no melody. In Europe it would have been called noise. But candombe had a potency that hit him in his belly, and in depths he hadn't known about.
    Carolina de Robertis, The Gods of Tango (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2015), pp. 115-16

    September 4, 2016

  • From a novel set (mostly) in Buenos Aires in 1913-1920:, this is a flashback to, probably late 19th century:

    in Buenos Aires . . . music rapped and hummed on every corner . . . payadas, sung by pairs of country men who knew the life of gauchos and horses and lassos and dirt, who battled each other through song, . . .; habaneras, sparked by sailors freshly arrived from Cuba . . .; milongas, those fast joyful songs that could fill a filthy alley with dancers more quickly than honey could draw flies; and candombe, the music of black people whose ancestors had come in ships from Africa, shackled, enslaved, and who now lived among the immigrants, . . . with the most incredible music, . . . music played on drums built with cast-off barrels, whose rhythms interlocked to form a tight vast sound. There was no melody. In Europe it would have been called noise. But candombe had a potency that hit him in his belly, and in depths he hadn't known about.
    Carolina de Robertis, The Gods of Tango (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2015), pp. 115-16

    September 4, 2016

  • From a novel set (mostly) in Buenos Aires in 1913-1920:, this is a flashback to, probably late 19th century:

    in Buenos Aires . . . music rapped and hummed on every corner . . . payadas, sung by pairs of country men who knew the life of gauchos and horses and lassos and dirt, who battled each other through song, . . .; habaneras, sparked by sailors freshly arrived from Cuba . . .; milongas, those fast joyful songs that could fill a filthy alley with dancers more quickly than honey could draw flies; and candombe, the music of black people whose ancestors had come in ships from Africa, shackled, enslaved, and who now lived among the immigrants, . . . with the most incredible music, . . . music played on drums built with cast-off barrels, whose rhythms interlocked to form a tight vast sound. There was no melody. In Europe it would have been called noise. But candombe had a potency that hit him in his belly, and in depths he hadn't known about.
    Carolina de Robertis, The Gods of Tango (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2015), pp. 115-16

    September 4, 2016

  • From a novel set (mostly) in Buenos Aires in 1913-1920:, this is a flashback to, probably late 19th century:

    in Buenos Aires . . . music rapped and hummed on every corner . . . payadas, sung by pairs of country men who knew the life of gauchos and horses and lassos and dirt, who battled each other through song, . . .; habaneras, sparked by sailors freshly arrived from Cuba . . .; milongas, those fast joyful songs that could fill a filthy alley with dancers more quickly than honey could draw flies; and candombe, the music of black people whose ancestors had come in ships from Africa, shackled, enslaved, and who now lived among the immigrants, . . . with the most incredible music, . . . music played on drums built with cast-off barrels, whose rhythms interlocked to form a tight vast sound. There was no melody. In Europe it would have been called noise. But candombe had a potency that hit him in his belly, and in depths he hadn't known about.
    Carolina de Robertis, The Gods of Tango (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2015), pp. 115-16

    September 4, 2016

  • A tenement in Buenos Aires. From a novel set mostly in 1913-1918:

    When he arrived, he'd planned to wait until he could afford an apartment of his own, however humble, to marry. Over time, he saw how absurd this notion was in a city that had swelled with so many immigrants seeking a chance at life that rents had soared and sharing a conventillo with one bathroom and one kitchen for sixty people or more had become a normal way of life.
    Carolina de Robertis, The Gods of Tango (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2015), p. 62
    In the conventillos—wich earned their name, she'd learned, from their cramped spare nature, like the convents that house nuns and monks—there was always the lang of water tubs, the drag of crates across scuffed tiles, the bristling dutet of a man fighting with his wife, the shout or squeal or hungrey moan of children, mothers' reproaches and lullabies and threats, . . .
    Id., p. 81

    September 4, 2016

  • Earth's early plant biosphere consisted of simple bryophytes, such as moss, which are non-vascular -- meaning they do not have vein-like systems to conduct water and minerals around the plant.
    Humble Moss Helped Create Our Oxygen-Rich Atmosphere, Science Daily, Aug. 15, 2016

    August 19, 2016

  • If going outside isn't enough to cool down, honeybees

    will practice what Tom Seeley, professr of biology in the department of Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell University, calls "social ventilation." The bees will stand at the entrance to the hive, line up, and beat their wings in synchrony to generate air velocities of more than 6 feet per second. "It's quite a breeze, you can put your hand in front of a hive and actually feel a draft," Seeley said.
    Lynda V. Mapes, Keeping Their Cool, Seattle Times, July 29, 2016, p. B1

    July 30, 2016

  • On a really hot day—like the mid-80s expected Friday—you'll see crows and other birds holding their mouths open. They are practicing what scientists call gular fluttering—panting.
    Lynda V. Mapes, Keeping Their Cool, Seattle Times, July 29, 2016, p. B1

    July 30, 2016

  • Barking is Douchka's worst problem, but not her only one; in fact, it may not be going too far to describe the dog as barking mad. She's nervous and needy and can't be left alone, demanding Audry's constant attention . . . .
    Mikita Brottman, The Great Grisby: Two Thousand Years of Exceptional Dogs (New York: HarperCollins), ch. 4.

    July 26, 2016

  • In Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, the first sign of Mr. Rochester's presence is the sight of his faithful companion Pilot, a "great black and white long-haired dog" that Jane, encountering on a dark night, first mistakes for a Gytrash, "a lion-like creature with long hair and a huge head."
    Mikita Brottman, The Great Grisby: Two Thousand Years of Exceptional Dogs (New York: HarperCollins), ch. 2.

    July 26, 2016

  • Gene drives are systems of biased inheritance in which the ability of a genetic element to pass from a parent to its offspring through sexual reproduction is enhanced.

    . . .

    A gene drive that alters the female mosquito’s ability to become infected with the malaria parasite, or prevents the parasite development within the mosquito, could block malarial transmission without affecting mosquito populations.

    National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, Gene Drives on the Horizon: Advancing Science, Navigating Uncertainty, and Aligning Research with Public Values (2016), pp. 1-2

    July 12, 2016

  • The word restavèk comes from the Creole and French meaning “to stay with.” The term is given to children who come from poor, usually rural families that are sent to live and work as domestic servants in homes without any compensation.In principle, placement of a restavèk involves a parent turning over childrearing responsibility to another household in exchange for the child’s unpaid domestic service. The traditional expectation is that the “caretaker” household will cover the cost of sending the restavèk child to school. The term is widely used in Haiti and has a significant negative connotation, including that such children are dependent and servile. Many restavèk children are exploited and this has a lasting effect on their education, health, mental wellbeing and overall development.
    Republic of Haiti, The Plight of Restavèk (Child Domestic Servants), Submission for the 112th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Committee, Oct. 8 & 9, 2014.

    July 5, 2016

  • See restavèk

    July 5, 2016

  • See estavèk.

    July 5, 2016

  • The post-1965 wave of immigration gave birth to the modern-day "ethnoburb," a clever scholarly integration of the terms ethnic and suburb. Just east of Los Angeles lies Monterey Park, the quintessential example of the American ethnoburb. Hailed as America's "first suburban Chinatown," Monterey Park houses the largest concentration of Chinese Americans in the United States. Half of the residents are of Chinese descent—mainly Chinese (and Taiwanese) professionals and entrepreneurs who migrated after 1970 and upwardly mobile Chinese Americans eager to move out of a rapidly declining Chinatown.
    Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 3.

    July 2, 2016

  • Neighborhoods have always played a pivotal role in how immigrants and their children adapt to life in the United States. . . . Unable to integrate into the mainstream middle sectors of American society, many found refuge in residential spaces that resembled their homelands, at least in terms of the cultural landscape. Within these ethnic enclaves, immigrants could form intimate connections, attend places of worship, and practice their cultural traditions with others from their home country, all the while slowly sharpening their English skills and learning American ways of life.
    Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 3.

    July 2, 2016

  • The colonial government also established scholarships for academically gifted Filipino men to pursue their college educations in the United States. These young scholars, who were better known as pensionados, studied everything from economics to politics to agriculture at American universities. In exchange for their free education, the United States required that these men return to the Philippines and serve as teachers, engineers and civil servants.
    Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 2.

    July 2, 2016

  • In an effort to "civilize" the Filipino people, the Americans established a public education system and made English the medium of instruction. Legions of American teachers, known as the Thomasites, were recruited by the US government to teach Filipino children American history, politics, and cultural traditions.
    Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 2.

    July 2, 2016

  • Another sense: some sort of Mexican food.

    Alicia joked she had enough evidence to "prove" that her friend Camille was "really Mexican." At Camille's family gatherings, she always noticed the food. "There was carne asada, there was pastor, there was flan. Some of them had different names, but they were pretty much the same," Alicia said.
    Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 1.

    July 2, 2016

  • Because the earliest waves of Filipino immigrants were overwhelmingly male, many ended up marrying Mexican women and forming "Mexipino" families and communities.
    Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 1.

    July 2, 2016


  • In Los Angeles, for instance, Latinos and Asian Americans now make up a collective majority. This book investigates how Filipinos understand their identity vis-à-vis these two fast-growing communities. In other words, I am interested in panethnic moments, or those times when Filipinos have felt a sense of collective identity with either Latinos or other Asians. That Filipinos share historical and cultural connections with both Latinos and Asians makes this an even more interesting puzzle to investigate.
    Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 1.
    Undoubtedly, the 1960s civil rights movement also reshaped how people came to value minority identities. . . . Ethnic groups that once considered themselves separate came together inside panethnic identities.
    <i>Id.</i>

    Filipinos' unwillingness to identify <b>panethnically</b> speaks volumes about their ambivalent relationship with Asian American identity.
    Id., ch. 4.

    July 2, 2016

  • <blockquote>In Los Angeles, for instance, Latinos and Asian Americans now make up a collective majority. This book investigates how Filipinos understand their identity vis-à-vis these two fast-growing communities. In other words, I am interested in panethnic moments, or those times when Filipinos have felt a sense of collective identity with either Latinos or other Asians. That Filipinos share historical and cultural connections with both Latinos nd Asians makes this an even more interesting puzzle to investigate.</blockquote>Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 1.

    Undoubtedly, the 1960s civil rights movement also reshaped how people came to value minority identities. . . . Ethnic groups that once considered themselves separate came together inside panethnic identities.
    <i>Id.</i>

    Filipinos' unwillingness to identify <b>panethnically</b> speaks volumes about their ambivalent relationship with Asian American identity.
    Id., ch. 4.

    July 2, 2016

  • In Los Angeles, for instance, Latinos and Asian Americans now make up a collective majority. This book investigates how Filipinos understand their identity vis-à-vis these two fast-growing communities. In other words, I am interested in pandemic moments, or those times when Filipinos have felt a sense of collective identity with either Latinos or other Asians. That Filipinos share historical and cultural connections with both Latinos and Asians makes this an even more interesting puzzle to investigate.
    Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 1.

    July 2, 2016

  • the term Asian American did not even exist until the late 1960s, when Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino activists coined the identity as an ideological strategy to advocate for their civil rights.
    Anthony Christian Ocampo, The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race (Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press, 2016), ch. 1.

    July 2, 2016

  • For the first half-hour that Edna Molewa, the honorable minister of environmental affairs (South Africa), speaks, we hear words like "bioprospecting" but not words like "biodiversity." To bioprospect is to scout out "green gold," plants and animals of commercial value.

    "We need to improve the infrastructure of our national parks, to facilitate bioprospecting" says the minister. This is in the spirit of the "green economy" and "job creation," important buzzwords in the country's "new sustainable economy." South Africa, one of the 17 megadiverse countries—those that together account for 70 percent of Earth's biodiversity—is just one of many nations with recent bioprospecting legislation.

    Katarzyna Nowak, "Rhinos Under the Gun," American Scholar, Summer 2016, p. 6, at p. 9.

    July 2, 2016

  • For the first half-hour that Edna Molewa, the honorable minister of environmental affairs (South Africa), speaks, we hear words like "bioprospecting" but not words like "biodiversity." To bioprospect is to scout out "green gold," plants and animals of commercial value.

    "We need to improve the infrastructure of our national parks, to facilitate bioprospecting" says the minister. This is in the spirit of the "green economy" and "job creation," important buzzwords in the country's "new sustainable economy." South Africa, one of the 17 megadiverse countries—those that together account for 70 percent of Earth's biodiversity—is just one of many nations with recent bioprospecting legislation.

    Katarzyna Nowak, "Rhinos Under the Gun," American Scholar, Summer 2016, p. 6, at p. 9.

    July 2, 2016

  • For the first half-hour that Edna Molewa, the honorable minister of environmental affairs (South Africa), speaks, we hear words like "bioprospecting" but not words like "biodiversity." To bioprospect is to scout out "green gold," plants and animals of commercial value.

    "We need to improve the infrastructure of our national parks, to facilitate bioprospecting" says the minister. This is in the spirit of the "green economy" and "job creation," important buzzwords in the country's "new sustainable economy." South Africa, one of the 17 megadiverse countries—those that together account for 70 percent of Earth's biodiversity—is just one of many nations with recent bioprospecting legislation.

    Katarzyna Nowak, "Rhinos Under the Gun," American Scholar, Summer 2016, p. 6, at p. 9.

    July 2, 2016

  • For the first half-hour that Edna Molewa, the honorable minister of environmental affairs (South Africa), speaks, we hear words like "bioprospecting" but not words like "biodiversity." To bioprospect is to scout out "green gold," plants and animals of commercial value.

    "We need to improve the infrastructure of our national parks, to facilitate bioprospecting" says the minister. This is in the spirit of the "green economy" and "job creation," important buzzwords in the country's "new sustainable economy." South Africa, one of the 17 megadiverse countries—those that together account for 70 percent of Earth's biodiversity—is just one of many nations with recent bioprospecting legislation.

    Katarzyna Nowak, "Rhinos Under the Gun," American Scholar, Summer 2016, p. 6, at p. 9.

    July 2, 2016

  • <blockquote>For the first half-hour that Edna Molewa, the honorable minister of environmental affairs (South Africa), speaks, we hear words like "<b>bioprospecting</b>" but not words like "biodiversity." To <b>bioprospect</b> is to scout out "<b>green gold</b>," plants and animals of commercial value.

    "We need to improve the infrastructure of our national parks, to facilitate <b>bioprospecting</b>" says the minister. This is in the spirit of the "<b>green economy</b>" and "job creation," important buzzwords in the country's "new sustainable economy." South Africa, one of the 17 <b>megadiverse</b> countries&mdash;those that together account for 70 percent of Earth's biodiversity&mdash;is just one of many nations with recent <b>bioprospecting</b> legislation.</blockquote>Katarzyna Nowak, "Rhinos Under the Gun," American Scholar, Summer 2016, p. 6, at p. 9.

    July 2, 2016

  • First, we considered official congressional travel. Taking fact-finding trips abroad as part of formal congressional delegations—known as CODELs—is one way to gather the information needed to make informed foreign policy decisions. Some CODELs are partisan (all members traveling together are of the same party), and others are bipartisan (the CODEL includes at least one Democrat and one Republican). If women prioritize accruing information in a more collegial, cooperative way, then they should take fewer partisan, and more bipartisan, trips than men. They don’t.
    Jennifer L. Lawless & Sean M. Theriault, Off the softball field, Congresswomen are plenty partisan Brookings Fixgov blog, June 15, 2016.

    I first heard the term in season 5 of the West Wing, when Donna Moss, Rep. Andy Wyatt, and Admiral Fitzwallace go on a CODEL to Gaza. I couldn't pick up what Josh was saying when he told Donna she'd be going—codell? codelle?

    June 27, 2016

  • The inmate says he was caught recently with two ounces of "mojo," or synthetic marijuana, which is the drug of choice at Winn.
    Shane Bauer, My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard, Mother Jones, July/Aug. 2016

    June 27, 2016

  • See scène à faire

    June 24, 2016

  • the motif has become, for me, “scenes a faire,” a copyright term of art for stock scenes or plot devices in plays or novels, but which I have adopted for standard devices used in composing music. These are not “building blocks” in the sense of notes and chords, but a more complex composing “design tool.”
    Sean O'Connor, Why "Stairway to Heaven" Doesn't Infringe "Taurus" Copyright: analysis & demo of "scenes a faire"' motif common to both, The Means of Innovation, June 15, 2016

    Scène à faire (French for "scene to be made" or "scene that must be done"; plural: scènes à faire) is a scene in a book or film which is almost obligatory for a genre of its type. In the U.S. it also refers to a principle in copyright law in which certain elements of a creative work are held to be not protected when they are mandated by or customary to the genre.
    Scènes à faire, Wikipedia

    I think the first use in a case is this:

    It is not claimed that the choice of the church as a refuge in storm lends itself to the assertion of copyrightable originality. Houses of worship have been asylums since their very beginning. At one time, the legal privilege of sanctuary attached to churches. And he who entered one of them acquired immunity against the law.

    The other small details, on which stress is laid, such as the playing of the piano, the prayer, the hunger motive, as it called, are inherent in the situation itself. They are what the French call "scènes à faire". Once having placed two persons in a church during a big storm, it was inevitable that incidents like these and others which are, necessarily, associated with such a situation should force themselves upon the writer in developing the theme. Courts have held repeatedly that such similarities and incidental details necessary to the environment or setting of an action are not the material of which copyrightable originality consists.

    Cain v. Universal Pictures Co., 47 F. Supp. 1013 (S.D. Cal. 1942) (Yankwich, J.)

    June 24, 2016

  • the motif has become, for me, “scenes a faire,” a copyright term of art for stock scenes or plot devices in plays or novels, but which I have adopted for standard devices used in composing music. These are not “building blocks” in the sense of notes and chords, but a more complex composing “design tool.”
    Sean O'Connor, Why "Stairway to Heaven" Doesn't Infringe "Taurus" Copyright: analysis & demo of "scenes a faire"' motif common to both, The Means of Innovation, June 15, 2016

    Scène à faire (French for "scene to be made" or "scene that must be done"; plural: scènes à faire) is a scene in a book or film which is almost obligatory for a genre of its type. In the U.S. it also refers to a principle in copyright law in which certain elements of a creative work are held to be not protected when they are mandated by or customary to the genre.
    Scènes à faire, Wikipedia

    I think the first use in a case is this:

    It is not claimed that the choice of the church as a refuge in storm lends itself to the assertion of copyrightable originality. Houses of worship have been asylums since their very beginning. At one time, the legal privilege of sanctuary attached to churches. And he who entered one of them acquired immunity against the law.

    The other small details, on which stress is laid, such as the playing of the piano, the prayer, the hunger motive, as it called, are inherent in the situation itself. They are what the French call "scènes à faire". Once having placed two persons in a church during a big storm, it was inevitable that incidents like these and others which are, necessarily, associated with such a situation should force themselves upon the writer in developing the theme. Courts have held repeatedly that such similarities and incidental details necessary to the environment or setting of an action are not the material of which copyrightable originality consists.

    Cain v. Universal Pictures Co., 47 F. Supp. 1013 (S.D. Cal. 1942) (Yankwich, J.)

    June 24, 2016

  • A neighbor asks to use your yard waste bin and promises, "I'll leave an ullage for you."

    June 17, 2016

  • See Hispandering.

    June 16, 2016

  • Political pandering to Hispanic voters.

    See Hispandering: Is It over Yet?, Latino USA, NPR, June 10, 2016:<blockquote>With both parties knowing who the presumptive nominees are, it might feel like the surge of pandering to Hispanics, or "Hispandering," has wound down. But has it?</blockquote>

    I see scarequotes spotted this word seven months ago. Here it is again. Maybe this shows staying power.

    June 16, 2016

  • See corbie step.

    the skyline of spires and crowstepped gables
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 142.

    a fissure crowstepping its way down between the brickwork above the porch
    Id., p. 326.

    June 5, 2016

  • See corbie step.

    June 5, 2016

  • The gym involved regular commitment, and outwith her job, she was crap at regular commitment.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 106.

    June 5, 2016

  • Gloria had put "Church of Scotland" on Graham's admission form just to annoy him if he lived. Now she rather regretted not putting "Jain Buddhist" or "druid," as it might have led to an interesting and informative discussion with whatever hierophant represented their religion in the Royal Infirmary.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 104.

    June 5, 2016

  • He was more of a magpie—jabbering, yobbish birds who stole from other birds' nests.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 104.

    June 5, 2016

  • Despite having lived in Scotland for four decades, Gloria found that the word "sheriff" did not immediately conjure up the Scottish judiciary. Instead she tended to see tin stars at high noon and Alan Wheatley as the evil Sheriff of Nottingham in the old children's television program Robin Hood.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 104.

    June 5, 2016

  • descriptor for knitted baby clothes:

    Beryl, Graham's mother, had been a knitter, producing endless matinee sets when Emily and Ewan were babies—hats, jackets, mittens, bootees, leggings—threaded with fiddly ribbons and full of holes for tiny fingers to get caught in.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 101.

    June 5, 2016

  • Knitted baby clothes:

    Beryl, Graham's mother, had been a knitter, producing endless matinee sets when Emily and Ewan were babies—hats, jackets, mittens, bootees, leggings—threaded with fiddly ribbons and full of holes for tiny fingers to get caught in.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 101.

    June 5, 2016

  • Gloria regretted that she wasn't a knitter, she could be producing a useful garment while waiting for Graham to die. the tricoteuse of the ICU. Beryl, Graham's mother, had been a knitter, producing endless matinee sets when Emily and Ewan were babies—hats, jackets, mittens, bootees, leggings—threaded with fiddly ribbons and full of holes for tiny fingers to get caught in.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 101.

    June 5, 2016

  • He passed a couple of their way back, retired middle-class types in Peter Storm jackets, binoculars slung around their necks, yomping briskly back to shore . . . .
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 94.

    June 5, 2016

  • In these senses of dress:

    transitive v. To put a finish on (stone or wood, for example).

    v. To prepare the surface of (a material; usually stone or lumber).

    transitive v. To cut to proper dimensions, or give proper shape to, as to a tool by hammering; also, to smooth or finish.

    v. put a finish on

    The Castle seemed not so much a product of engineering as of organic growth, the dressed stone fused with the rough black basalt of the rock and its own bloody history.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 64.

    June 5, 2016

  • British crime: Grievous Bodily Harm.

    Honda Man . . . was a nutter up for a rammy, and when he suddenly produced a baseballbat Jackson realized he must have had it with him when he got out of the car. Premeditated GBH, the ex-policeman in him was thinking.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 40.

    June 5, 2016

  • From context, a fight, a scuffle.

    Honda Man . . . was a nutter up for a rammy, and when he suddenly produced a baseballbat Jackson realized he must have had it with him when he got out of the car. Premeditated GBH, the ex-policeman in him was thinking.
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 40.

    June 5, 2016

  • See hotch.

    the place was crowded, "hoaching," his father would have said. Jackson's father was a miner, from Fife originally. . . .
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 38.

    June 5, 2016

  • Statues, also called red light, green light (US) or grandmother's footsteps (UK), is a popular children's game, often played in Australia, Finland, Sweden, and the United States. How the game is played varies throughout different regions of the world.
    <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statues_%28game%29">Statues (game)</a>, Wikipedia

    June 5, 2016

  • A Britishism for what Americans call the game of Telephone.

    Gloria hadn't really seen what had happened. By the time the rumor of it had rippled down the spine of the queue, she suspected it had become a Chinese whisper
    Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn (New York: Little, Brown & Co., 2006), p. 21.

    June 5, 2016

  • A community band in Seattle: The

    June 1, 2016

  • Good idea, bilby. I just came across "cling film" (actually "cling filmed") in a British novel. Of course I could tell it was what we call Saran(TM) Wrap, plastic wrap, or cling wrap, but I liked learning that the Brits call it cling film.

    June 1, 2016

  • The study of the ethical, legal and social implications of neuroscience is being referred to “neuroethics.” Many types of brain research have, or will have, legal implications. However, this article will focus on the privacy concerns with respect to mental and cerebral functioning as delineated through brain imaging and other neurodiagnostic techniques—or what will be referred to here as “neuroprivacy.”
    N.Y. City Bar Ass'n, Committee on Science and Law, Are Your Thoughts Your Own?: Neuroprivacy and the Legal Implications of Brain Imaging (June 2005).

    June 1, 2016

  • In 2005, The Committee on Science and Law considered possible legal implications of neural engineering. An emphasis was put on privacy implications of neural imaging, in particular on the use of neural imaging in non-medical research. The committee recognized neuromarketing, defined as the field of marketing research that studies consumers’ sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective response to marketing stimuli and brain fingerprinting, defined as a technique that purports to determine the truth by detecting information stored in the brain, as emerging non-medical areas using neural imaging data.
    Tamara Bonaci, Ryan Calo & Howard Jay Chizeck, App Stores for the Brain: Privacy & Security in Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2014 IEEE Int’l Symp. on Ethics in Sci., Tech. & Eng’rg at 1-7, reprinted in IEEE Tech. & Soc’y Mag., June 2015, at 32-39 (citing N.Y. City Bar Ass'n, Committee on Science and Law, Are Your Thoughts Your Own?: Neuroprivacy and the Legal Implications of Brain Imaging (June 2005)).

    June 1, 2016

  • In 2005, The Committee on Science and Law considered possible legal implications of neural engineering. An emphasis was put on privacy implications of neural imaging, in particular on the use of neural imaging in non-medical research. The committee recognized neuromarketing, defined as the field of marketing research that studies consumers’ sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective response to marketing stimuli and brain fingerprinting, defined as a technique that purports to determine the truth by detecting information stored in the brain, as emerging non-medical areas using neural imaging data.
    Tamara Bonaci, Ryan Calo & Howard Jay Chizeck, App Stores for the Brain: Privacy & Security in Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2014 IEEE Int’l Symp. on Ethics in Sci., Tech. & Eng’rg at 1-7, reprinted in IEEE Tech. & Soc’y Mag., June 2015, at 32-39 (citing N.Y. City Bar Ass'n, Committee on Science and Law, Are Your Thoughts Your Own?: Neuroprivacy and the Legal Implications of Brain Imaging (June 2005)).

    June 1, 2016

  • In 2005, The Committee on Science and Law considered possible legal implications of neural engineering. An emphasis was put on privacy implications of neural imaging, in particular on the use of neural imaging in non-medical research. The committee recognized neuromarketing, defined as the field of marketing research that studies consumers’ sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective response to marketing stimuli and brain fingerprinting, defined as a technique that purports to determine the truth by detecting information stored in the brain, as emerging non-medical areas using neural imaging data.
    Tamara Bonaci, Ryan Calo & Howard Jay Chizeck, App Stores for the Brain: Privacy & Security in Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2014 IEEE Int’l Symp. on Ethics in Sci., Tech. & Eng’rg at 1-7, reprinted in IEEE Tech. & Soc’y Mag., June 2015, at 32-39 (citing N.Y. City Bar Ass'n, Committee on Science and Law, Are Your Thoughts Your Own?: Neuroprivacy and the Legal Implications of Brain Imaging (June 2005)).

    June 1, 2016

  • In 2005, The Committee on Science and Law considered possible legal implications of neural engineering. An emphasis was put on privacy implications of neural imaging, in particular on the use of neural imaging in non-medical research. The committee recognized neuromarketing, defined as the field of marketing research that studies consumers’ sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective response to marketing stimuli and brain fingerprinting, defined as a technique that purports to determine the truth by detecting information stored in the brain, as emerging non-medical areas using neural imaging data.
    Tamara Bonaci, Ryan Calo & Howard Jay Chizeck, App Stores for the Brain: Privacy & Security in Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2014 IEEE Int’l Symp. on Ethics in Sci., Tech. & Eng’rg at 1-7, reprinted in IEEE Tech. & Soc’y Mag., June 2015, at 32-39 (citing N.Y. City Bar Ass'n, Committee on Science and Law, Are Your Thoughts Your Own?: Neuroprivacy and the Legal Implications of Brain Imaging (June 2005)).

    June 1, 2016

  • In 2003, Jonsen introduced neuroethics as "a discipline that aligns the exploration and discovery of neurobiological knowledge with human value system".

    Tamara Bonaci, Ryan Calo & Howard Jay Chizeck, App Stores for the Brain: Privacy & Security in Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2014 IEEE Int’l Symp. on Ethics in Sci., Tech. & Eng’rg at 1-7, reprinted in IEEE Tech. & Soc’y Mag., June 2015, at 32-39 (citing A.r. Jonsen, The Birth of Bioethics (New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 2003)).

    June 1, 2016

  • As BCI technology spreads further (towards becoming ubiquitous), it is easy to imagine more sophisticated "spying" applications being developed for nefarious purposes. Leveraging recent neuroscience results . . ., it may be possible to extract private informaiton about users' memories, prejudices, religious and political beliefs, as well as about their possible neurophysiological disorders. The extracted information could be used to manipulate or coerce users, or otherwise harm them. The impact of "brain malware" could be severe, in terms of privacy and other important values.
    Tamara Bonaci, Ryan Calo & Howard Jay Chizeck, App Stores for the Brain: Privacy & Security in Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2014 IEEE Int’l Symp. on Ethics in Sci., Tech. & Eng’rg at 1-7, reprinted in IEEE Tech. & Soc’y Mag., June 2015, at 32-39.

    June 1, 2016

  • Experiential Technology “XTech” is technology that directly improves the human experience.

    XTech products combine digital technology with advances in neuroscience to improve human performance, including neurogaming applications. XTech products are impacting several $100B+ year industries including health, wellness, learning, training, sports and entertainment, creating massive new growth opportunities.

    XTech is made possible because of the emergence of new digital technologies, including: digital reality systems - virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and mix reality (MR), artificial intelligence and deep learning algorithms, advanced robotics, and a wide variety of new sensor technologies. XTech companies are fusing these digital technologies with evolving neuroscience principals to achieve improvements in human performance in fundamentally new ways.

    At XTech 2016, we will explore how XTech is creating entirely new markets such as digital therapeutics, validated neurowellness, accelerated learning and experiential entertainment. We are bringing together the leading entrepreneurs, investors and companies in all these new markets to show their XTech and share their journey on the road to success.

    When we first coined the phrase “neurogaming” five years ago and put together a small San Francisco conference around the concept, “neurogaming” proved to be an effective meme for gathering a lot of like minded individuals coming from across a wide variety of professions and industries who were interested in leveraging neurosciences and new digital engagement technologies.

    While neurogaming is still a very useful description for many applications, whether "therapeutic neurogaming", "wellness neurogaming", "educational neurogaming" or "entertainment neurogaming", it wasn’t capturing profound breadth of applications that are now emerging which are leveraging digital technology coupled with advances in neuroscience to positively impact the human experience.

    . . .it was important to evolve the neurogaming meme into some that could be much larger and would attract a larger community.

    This new meme is Experiential Technology, XTech, a phrase which we believe represents a whole new wave of technologies that will shape our world in very profound ways over the next decade.

    Experience XTech, www.neurgamingconf.com (visited June 1, 2016).

    June 1, 2016

  • Experiential Technology “XTech” is technology that directly improves the human experience.

    XTech products combine digital technology with advances in neuroscience to improve human performance, including neurogaming applications. XTech products are impacting several $100B+ year industries including health, wellness, learning, training, sports and entertainment, creating massive new growth opportunities.

    XTech is made possible because of the emergence of new digital technologies, including: digital reality systems - virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and mix reality (MR), artificial intelligence and deep learning algorithms, advanced robotics, and a wide variety of new sensor technologies. XTech companies are fusing these digital technologies with evolving neuroscience principals to achieve improvements in human performance in fundamentally new ways.

    At XTech 2016, we will explore how XTech is creating entirely new markets such as digital therapeutics, validated neurowellness, accelerated learning and experiential entertainment. We are bringing together the leading entrepreneurs, investors and companies in all these new markets to show their XTech and share their journey on the road to success.

    When we first coined the phrase “neurogaming” five years ago and put together a small San Francisco conference around the concept, “neurogaming” proved to be an effective meme for gathering a lot of like minded individuals coming from across a wide variety of professions and industries who were interested in leveraging neurosciences and new digital engagement technologies.

    While neurogaming is still a very useful description for many applications, whether "therapeutic neurogaming", "wellness neurogaming", "educational neurogaming" or "entertainment neurogaming", it wasn’t capturing profound breadth of applications that are now emerging which are leveraging digital technology coupled with advances in neuroscience to positively impact the human experience.

    . . .it was important to evolve the neurogaming meme into some that could be much larger and would attract a larger community.

    This new meme is Experiential Technology, XTech, a phrase which we believe represents a whole new wave of technologies that will shape our world in very profound ways over the next decade.

    Experience XTech, www.neurgamingconf.com (visited June 1, 2016).

    June 1, 2016

  • When we first coined the phrase “neurogaming” five years ago and put together a small San Francisco conference around the concept, “neurogaming” proved to be an effective meme for gathering a lot of like minded individuals coming from across a wide variety of professions and industries who were interested in leveraging neurosciences and new digital engagement technologies.

    While neurogaming is still a very useful description for many applications, whether "therapeutic neurogaming", "wellness neurogaming", "educational neurogaming" or "entertainment neurogaming", it wasn’t capturing profound breadth of applications that are now emerging which are leveraging digital technology coupled with advances in neuroscience to positively impact the human experience.

    . . .it was important to evolve the neurogaming meme into some that could be much larger and would attract a larger community.

    This new meme is Experiential Technology, XTech, a phrase which we believe represents a whole new wave of technologies that will shape our world in very profound ways over the next decade.

    Experience XTech, www.neurgamingconf.com (visited June 1, 2016).

    June 1, 2016

  • When we first coined the phrase “neurogaming” five years ago and put together a small San Francisco conference around the concept, “neurogaming” proved to be an effective meme for gathering a lot of like minded individuals coming from across a wide variety of professions and industries who were interested in leveraging neurosciences and new digital engagement technologies.

    While neurogaming is still a very useful description for many applications, whether "therapeutic neurogaming", "wellness neurogaming", "educational neurogaming" or "entertainment neurogaming", it wasn’t capturing profound breadth of applications that are now emerging which are leveraging digital technology coupled with advances in neuroscience to positively impact the human experience.

    . . .it was important to evolve the neurogaming meme into some that could be much larger and would attract a larger community.

    This new meme is Experiential Technology, XTech, a phrase which we believe represents a whole new wave of technologies that will shape our world in very profound ways over the next decade.

    Experience XTech, www.neurgamingconf.com (visited June 1, 2016).

    June 1, 2016

  • When we first coined the phrase “neurogaming” five years ago and put together a small San Francisco conference around the concept, “neurogaming” proved to be an effective meme for gathering a lot of like minded individuals coming from across a wide variety of professions and industries who were interested in leveraging neurosciences and new digital engagement technologies.

    While neurogaming is still a very useful description for many applications, whether "therapeutic neurogaming", "wellness neurogaming", "educational neurogaming" or "entertainment neurogaming", it wasn’t capturing profound breadth of applications that are now emerging which are leveraging digital technology coupled with advances in neuroscience to positively impact the human experience.

    . . .it was important to evolve the neurogaming meme into some that could be much larger and would attract a larger community.

    This new meme is Experiential Technology, XTech, a phrase which we believe represents a whole new wave of technologies that will shape our world in very profound ways over the next decade.

    Experience XTech, www.neurgamingconf.com (visited June 1, 2016).

    June 1, 2016

  • When we first coined the phrase “neurogaming” five years ago and put together a small San Francisco conference around the concept, “neurogaming” proved to be an effective meme for gathering a lot of like minded individuals coming from across a wide variety of professions and industries who were interested in leveraging neurosciences and new digital engagement technologies.

    While neurogaming is still a very useful description for many applications, whether "therapeutic neurogaming", "wellness neurogaming", "educational neurogaming" or "entertainment neurogaming", it wasn’t capturing profound breadth of applications that are now emerging which are leveraging digital technology coupled with advances in neuroscience to positively impact the human experience.

    . . .it was important to evolve the neurogaming meme into some that could be much larger and would attract a larger community.

    This new meme is Experiential Technology, XTech, a phrase which we believe represents a whole new wave of technologies that will shape our world in very profound ways over the next decade.

    Experience XTech, www.neurgamingconf.com (visited June 1, 2016).

    June 1, 2016

  • When we first coined the phrase “neurogaming” five years ago and put together a small San Francisco conference around the concept, “neurogaming” proved to be an effective meme for gathering a lot of like minded individuals coming from across a wide variety of professions and industries who were interested in leveraging neurosciences and new digital engagement technologies.

    While neurogaming is still a very useful description for many applications, whether "therapeutic neurogaming", "wellness neurogaming", "educational neurogaming" or "entertainment neurogaming", it wasn’t capturing profound breadth of applications that are now emerging which are leveraging digital technology coupled with advances in neuroscience to positively impact the human experience.

    . . .it was important to evolve the neurogaming meme into some that could be much larger and would attract a larger community.

    This new meme is Experiential Technology, XTech, a phrase which we believe represents a whole new wave of technologies that will shape our world in very profound ways over the next decade.

    Experience XTech, www.neurgamingconf.com (visited June 1, 2016).

    June 1, 2016

  • She wore a fluttering white garden party dress—it looked as though it were made of spun sugar—lace gloves, lace hat, lace parasol which she twirledcoquettishly, and a lace fichu which she kept dropping to be retrieved by the pimpled gallants of St. Boniface.

    Patrick Dennis, Auntie Mame (New York: Broadway Books, 2001), p. 65 (orig. pub. 1955)

    June 1, 2016

  • But conversant as she was with the decorative arts of France, Auntie Mame's heart was more with the Bauhaus of Munich than with the rocaille and coquaille.

    For a time, however, she was able to fight down her progressive impulses and string along with the staff at Elsie de Wolfe's, chirping prettily over dim ormolu wall sconces and inaccurate cupid clocks.

    Patrick Dennis, Auntie Mame (New York: Broadway Books, 2001), p. 43 (orig. pub. 1955)

    June 1, 2016

  • But conversant as she was with the decorative arts of France, Auntie Mame's heart was more with the Bauhaus of Munich than with the rocaille and coquaille.

    For a time, however, she was able to fight down her progressive impulses and string along with the staff at Elsie de Wolfe's, chirping prettily over dim ormolu wall sconces and inaccurate cupid clocks.

    Patrick Dennis, Auntie Mame (New York: Broadway Books, 2001), p. 43 (orig. pub. 1955)

    June 1, 2016

  • But conversant as she was with the decorative arts of France, Auntie Mame's heart was more with the Bauhaus of Munich than with the rocaille and coquaille.

    For a time, however, she was able to fight down her progressive impulses and string along with the staff at Elsie de Wolfe's, chirping prettily over dim ormolu wall sconces and inaccurate cupid clocks.

    Patrick Dennis, Auntie Mame (New York: Broadway Books, 2001), p. 43 (orig. pub. 1955)

    June 1, 2016

  • My father made a passing reference to the uncanny-valley response—the human aversion to things that look almost but not quite like people. The uncanny-valley response is a hard thing to define, much less to test for. But if true, it explains why the faces of chimps so unsettle some of us.
    Karen Joy Fowler, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (Penguin Group): 2013), p. 102

    May 30, 2016

  • one of my most prized possessions was the skull of a woodcock, a probing bird, with enormous eye sockets and a distinctively pitted bill tip. These pits can be seen only after the leathery outer covering of the bill—the ramphotheca—has been removed.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    May 30, 2016

  • The bill-tip organ was discovered by the French anatomist D. E. Goujon in 1869. . . . this organ consists of a series of pits in the upper and lower beak, full of touch-sensitive cells.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 76.

    May 30, 2016

  • There are three types of feather. The most abundant and obvious are the contour feathers: these include the long, strong wing and tail feathers, but also the short feathers that cover the body and rictal bristles around the mouth. The second type are fluffy, down feathers, lying out of sight under the contour feathers close to the body. Their role is to act primarily as insulation . . . . The third type of feather is much less familiar and you are likely only to have noticed them if you have ever plucked a bird like a chicken or a pigeon. Once all the contour and down feathers have been removed, what's left are the filoplumes, fine hair-like feathers sparsely dotted over the entire body surface and always rooted close to the base of a contour feather.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    May 30, 2016

  • There are three types of feather. The most abundant and obvious are the contour feathers: these include the long, strong wing and tail feathers, but also the short feathers that cover the body and rictal bristles around the mouth. The second type are fluffy, down feathers, lying out of sight under the contour feathers close to the body. Their role is to act primarily as insulation . . . . The third type of feather is much less familiar and you are likely only to have noticed them if you have ever plucked a bird like a chicken or a pigeon. Once all the contour and down feathers have been removed, what's left are the filoplumes, fine hair-like feathers sparsely dotted over the entire body surface and always rooted close to the base of a contour feather.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    May 30, 2016

  • There are three types of feather. The most abundant and obvious are the contour feathers: these include the long, strong wing and tail feathers, but also the short feathers that cover the body and rictal bristles around the mouth. The second type are fluffy, down feathers, lying out of sight under the contour feathers close to the body. Their role is to act primarily as insulation . . . . The third type of feather is much less familiar and you are likely only to have noticed them if you have ever plucked a bird like a chicken or a pigeon. Once all the contour and down feathers have been removed, what's left are the filoplumes, fine hair-like feathers sparsely dotted over the entire body surface and always rooted close to the base of a contour feather.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    <blockquote>in a number of birds, most obviously nightjars, oilbirds and flycatchers, on the corners of the mouth is an array of stiff, hair-like bristles. These are modified contour feathers, called <b>rictal</b> (mouth) <b>bristles</b>, and the presence of a well-developed nerve supply at their base betrays their sensory function.</blockquote><i>Id.</i>, p. 85.

    May 30, 2016

  • There are three types of feather. The most abundant and obvious are the contour feathers: these include the long, strong wing and tail feathers, but also the short feathers that cover the body and rictal bristles around the mouth. The second type are fluffy, down feathers, lying out of sight under the contour feathers close to the body. Their role is to act primarily as insulation . . . . The third type of feather is much less familiar and you are likely only to have noticed them if you have ever plucked a bird like a chicken or a pigeon. Once all the contour and down feathers have been removed, what's left are the filoplumes, fine hair-like feathers sparsely dotted over the entire body surface and always rooted close to the base of a contour feather.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 83-84.

    May 30, 2016

  • Ornithologists refer to one individual preening another as allopreening ('allo' meaning 'other'), to distinguish it from the more usual self-preening.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 75

    May 30, 2016

  • Increasing the volume of sounds uttered in a noisy environment is actually a reflex known as the <b>Lombard effect</b>, named after Etienne Lombard, a French ear, nose and throat specialist who discovered it in humans in the early 1900s. The Lombard effect is most obvious when somebody is talking to you when, for example, you have your iPod headphones on and in respnse you—unwittingly—increase the volume of your reply, and they say: 'No need to shout!'
    Tim Birkhead, <i>Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird</i> (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 59

    May 30, 2016

  • The ability to focus on one particular voice or song against a hubbub of background noise is known as the cocktail-party effect. This is a common problem for birds that live in a noisy world. Just think of the dawn chorus. In pristine habitats there may be as many as thirty different songbird species—with several individuals of each—singing at once, and the effect can be almost deafening. Each bird has to dinstinguish not only its own species, but also different individuals.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 57

    May 30, 2016

  • The ability to focus on one particular voice or song against a hubbub of background noise is known as the cocktail-party effect. This is a common problem for birds that live in a noisy world. Just think of the dawn chorus. In pristine habitats there may be as many as thirty different songbird species—with several individuals of each—singing at once, and the effect can be almost deafening. Each bird has to dinstinguish not only its own species, but also different individuals.
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), p. 57

    May 30, 2016

  • One of the most brilliantly coloured of South American birds (and there are many) is the Andean cock-of-the-rock. The male has the most intensely red body, a jet-black tail and outermost wing feathers, and unexpectedly silvery-white innermost wing feathers. So-named because it nests among rocks on cliff ledges, and because of its cocky Mohican-like crest, this pigeon-sized bird is a major draw to birdwatchers visiting Ecuador. The males display in groups, referred to as 'leks' . . . .
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), pp. 19-20.

    May 30, 2016

  • One of the most brilliantly coloured of South American birds (and there are many) is the Andean cock-of-the-rock. The male has the most intensely red body, a jet-black tail and outermost wing feathers, and unexpectedly silvery-white innermost wing feathers. So-named because it nests among rocks on cliff ledges, and because of its cocky Mohican-like crest, this pigeon-sized bird is a major draw to birdwatchers visiting Ecuador. The males display in groups, referred to as 'leks' . . . .
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), pp. 19-20.

    May 30, 2016

  • One of the most brilliantly coloured of South American birds (and there are many) is the Andean cock-of-the-rock. The male has the most intensely red body, a jet-black tail and outermost wing feathers, and unexpectedly silvery-white innermost wing feathers. So-named because it nests among rocks on cliff ledges, and because of its cocky Mohican-like crest, this pigeon-sized bird is a major draw to birdwatchers visiting Ecuador. The males display in groups, referred to as 'leks' . . . .
    Tim Birkhead, Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird (New York: Walker & Co., 2012), pp. 19-20.

    May 30, 2016

  • It all had something to do with <b>Umwelt</b>, a word I very much liked the sound of and repeated many times like a drumbeat until I was made to stop. I didn't care so much what Umwelt meant back then, but it turns out to refer to the specific way each particular organism experiences the world.
    Karen Joy Fowler, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (Penguin Group): 2013), p. 99.

    May 30, 2016

  • My mother was often aggravated those days. It was something new for her, analeptic doses of righteous aggravation. She was rejuvenated by it.
    Karen Joy Fowler, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (Penguin Group): 2013), p. 6.

    May 30, 2016

  • we've been offered this gite in the Ardèche for a week . . ."
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 347.

    May 30, 2016

  • Amelia had been behaving even more oddly than usual, blethering about Olivia . . . . Blethering. That was one of his father's words.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 324

    May 30, 2016

  • A middle-aged man was climbing out of the river onto the bank—bollock-naked and skinny and tanned all over. A nudist? They called themselves naturalists now, didn't they?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 288.

    (Character misuses "naturalist" for "naturism.")

    May 30, 2016

  • A middle-aged man was climbing out of the river onto the bank—bollock-naked and skinny and tanned all over. A nudist? They called themselves naturalists now, didn't they?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 288.

    May 30, 2016

  • A middle-aged man was climbing out of the river onto the bank—bollock-naked and skinny and tanned all over. A nudist? They called themselves naturalists now, didn't they?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 288.

    May 30, 2016

  • at that moment a particularly manky tom decided it needed to spray its territory and favored Quintus's leg as one of its outposts.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 284.

    May 30, 2016

  • In the sense of "headbutt" (which shows up at least once in the definitions above):

    Quintus was sporting a considerable plaster across a nose that looked damaged in just the way you would expect a nose to be damaged if you'd been nutted by someone who was trying to stop you from pistol-whipping them.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 282.

    May 30, 2016

  • before he cold reply a cry like a huntsman's tantivy from the top end of the garden announced the arrival of Quintus Rain.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 281.

    May 30, 2016

  • They drove past the village school and she could hear James making snorting noises. She'd heard him refer to the the village kids as "oiks" and she'd almost slapped him. She suspected his slow male brain had confused "oik" with "oink," which was why he always snorted when he came within breathing distance of the lower orders.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 224.

    May 30, 2016

  • Sister Michael . . . was an "extern." There were six externs at the convent, negotiating with the outside world on behalf of the "interns"—the ones who never left, who spent their days, day after day, until they died, in prayer and contemplation.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 224.

    May 30, 2016

  • Sister Michael . . . was an "extern." There were six externs at the convent, negotiating with the outside world on behalf of the "interns"—the ones who never left, who spent their days, day after day, until they died, in prayer and contemplation.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 224.

    May 30, 2016

  • Was (a long-missing three-year-old) enclosed somewhere, under a floor, in the earth? No more than a tiny pile of leveret-thin bones waiting to be found.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 164.

    May 30, 2016

  • Still—and it was a close call—Jackson preferred the summer population to the yahs and hooray Henrys of term time. Was it just the envy of the underclass?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 162.

    May 30, 2016

  • Still—and it was a close call—Jackson preferred the summer population to the yahs and hooray Henrys of term time. Was it just the envy of the underclass?
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 162.

    May 30, 2016

  • All that wealth and privilege in the hands of a few while the streets were full of the dispossessed, the beggars, the jakies, the mad.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 162.

    May 30, 2016

  • All that wealth and privilege in the hands of a few while the streets were full of the dispossessed, the beggars, the jakies, the mad.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 162.

    May 30, 2016

  • "Don't be a crosspatch, Mr. Brodie. You're a much nicer person than you pretend to be, you know."
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 160.

    May 30, 2016

  • Caroline . . . had never been to an agricultural fair in her life and was charmed by everything. . . . the crocheted shawls and knitted matinee jackets . . .
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 145.

    May 30, 2016

  • She loved that word, "misericord," because it sounded so wretched and yet it wasn't. It meant tenderhearted, from the Latin for heart, "cor," from which you also get "core" and "cordial" but not "cardiac," which from via the Latin from the Greek for heart—"kardia" (although they mut surely be related at some ancient, ur-level.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 138.

    May 30, 2016

  • She was a lousy cook and didn't even possess a sewing basket, but she did all the DIY in their little box house. She said to him once that when women learned that wall anchors weren't the mysterious objects they though the were, they would rule the world.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 95.

    May 30, 2016

  • Howell dated from Jackson's army days—they had started out as squaddies together.
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 84.

    May 30, 2016

  • Binky was over ninety and was the widow of "a Peterhouse fellow," a philosophy don (despite living in Cambridge for fourteen years, Jackson still though of the mafia when he heard that word).
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 82.

    May 30, 2016

  • A dish of lasagna, neatly cling filmed, was sitting in the fridge, waiting to be heated up later . . . .
    Kate Atkinson, Case Histories (New York: Little Brown & Co., 2004), p. 66.

    May 30, 2016

Comments for MaryW

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  • You have an unclosed italic bracket on sung-through which borks the formatting of everything that comes after it on the Community page and on your own comments feed.

    May 23, 2016

  • j/k, no probs about the glitchygloops. Everyone who's been here a while has borked something or another.

    April 5, 2016

  • Should have got a good phone.

    April 5, 2016

  • I hear you about editing from a phone--but don't give up, MaryW! I enjoy your citations.

    April 4, 2016

  • bilby, you must have been right on it. I edited out the extraneous stuff within a minute or so.

    I've learned my lesson: don't try to do much here with my iPhone: it's too hard to proofread and edit.

    April 4, 2016

  • Please take care not to unncessarily include site menus in copy-pasted comments.

    April 4, 2016

  • In many cases "See citation on word" is also a good option.

    February 29, 2016

  • You have an unclosed italic HTML bracket on elytron.

    December 27, 2015