Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Wearing heavy or complete armor; carrying heavy arms.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Bearing heavy arms or armor: as, heavy-armed troops.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having massive arms

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He planned to march up Italys mountainous spine, keeping his mobile forces out of the heavy-armed Romans reach.

    The Spartacus War

  • They perfected light armor for foot soldiers and hit-and-run tactics, to which the heavy-armed Romans were vulnerable.

    The Spartacus War

  • That is Tissaphernes in command, they said, and next to these a body of men bearing wicker-shields, and next again heavy-armed infantry, with long wooden shields reaching to the feet.

    Anabasis

  • But when the Hellenes, being so pressed, made an attempt to pursue, they could barely scale to the summit, being heavy-armed troops, while the enemy as lightly sprung away; and they suffered similarly in retiring to join the rest of the army.

    Anabasis

  • These had nothing to do but to draw back from the point of egress, and being light troops easily escaped beyond the grasp of heavy-armed men, while ever and again, from one point of vantage or another, they poured their shower of javelins, and at every sally laid many a brave man low, till at length, like sheep penned in a fold, the defenders were shot down almost to a man.

    Hellenica

  • Lacedaemonian heavy-armed infantry levies amounted to six thousand men.

    Hellenica

  • These were the ancient Achaean inhabitants, living in towns and villages, and managing their own affairs, paying tribute, and serving in the army as heavy-armed soldiers.

    Hellenica

  • But now you have a larger fleet; this turns the balance in your favour; and you will fight close to a friendly shore under the protection of heavy-armed troops.

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • The Syracusans drew up their heavy-armed sixteen deep; the army consisted of the whole Syracusan people and their allies, chiefly the Selinuntians, who were in the city; they had also two hundred horsemen from Gela, and twenty, with about fifty archers, from

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • Large bodies of heavy-armed troops, both Athenian and Syracusan, were moving about in a narrow space; of the Athenians some were already worsted, while others, still unconquered, were carrying on the original movement.

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

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