Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n.pl. The 15th day of March, May, July, or October or the 13th day of the other months in the ancient Roman calendar.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. In the Roman calendar the fifteenth day of March, May, July, October, and the thirteenth day of the other months. Eight days after the nones.
  • n. Plural form of ide.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.pl. The fifteenth day of March, May, July, and October, and the thirteenth day of the other months.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In the ancient Roman calendar, the eighth day after the nones —that is, the 13th of January, February, April, June, August, September, November, and December, and the 15th of March, May, July, and October.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. in the Roman calendar: the 15th of March or May or July or October or the 13th of any other month

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Latin Īdūs.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
from Latin idus, possibly from Latin iduare to divide (Wiktionary)
from ide a fish (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • We all suffer from NIH (Not Invented Here) syndrome, our natural reaction to someone else's ides is "why it won't work" vs. "let's give it a try!"

    10 posts from September 2009

  • By the way, the ides is the 15th of March, May, July and October and the 13th of the other months, in case you were wondering, and the kalends is the first day of the month.

    You Can Stop Being Ware Now

  • D'ye think I don't know when the Lord 'ides' is face behind the clouds playin 'peep-bo for a bit, and lets the devil' ave it all 'is own way?

    God's Good Man

  • Non-native English speakers likely haven't heard the word "ides" before, even in their native language -- at least it doesn't seem to be common in Spanish or French.

    Planet GNOME

  • «Non-native English speakers likely haven't heard the word "ides" before».

    wingolog

  • If you have * any* doubts on this - check out his letter to Reverend Hardon in the "ides" chapeter of the blog.

    Sydney Indymedia - Comments

  • Officially, the term "ides" refers to the 15th day of certain months in the old Roman calendar.

    Forbes.com: News

  • [37]’ The ides was the time when money lent out at interest was commonly repaid.

    Christian Morals

  • S'pose I'm cast for the perishin 'strong man wot' ides 'is bleedin' 'eart. "

    Anthony Lyveden

  • But before you decide to hibernate for the season, check out some ways to handle the ides of winter until spring rolls around again.

    How To Fight The Winter Blues

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Comments

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  • Beware.

    March 17, 2009