Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To jabber; gabble.
  • To splash, as water; cause to splash, as a liquid.
  • n. A slight agitation on the surface of a liquid; small irregular waves running in all directions.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There is a perpetual "jabble" against the cliffs on this coast -- and we have seldom met with a soul save an aged and solitary fisherwoman -- a study for a Bonington -- pursuing her precarious calling of crab or shrimp fishing, or of pulling lobsters from their retreats in the savage cliffs.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 17, No. 494, June 18, 1831

  • When two tides meet there is ever a cruel commotion, and ships are apt to be dashed on the rocks, and Carmichael's mind was in a "jabble" that day.

    Kate Carnegie and Those Ministers

  • When we made the passage (bound, although yet we knew it not, for Silverado) the steamer jumped, and the black buoys were dancing in the jabble; the ocean breeze blew killing chill; and, although the upper sky was still unflecked with vapour, the sea fogs were pouring in from seaward, over the hilltops of Marin county, in one great, shapeless, silver cloud.

    The Silverado Squatters

  • We're no like you -- forced to lat ower (swallow) ony jabble o 'lukewarm water that's been stan'in'

    Alec Forbes of Howglen

  • But there was a _jabble_ in the room beside them, and Annie heard it.

    Alec Forbes of Howglen

  • Dark clouds were gathering up from the northward, and a short jabble of sea was rising which occasionally sent

    The Middy and the Moors An Algerine Story

  • There was plenty of space for it down below; and in a few seconds 'time it had all gone down to mix among the bilge-water, and jabble about during the remainder of the voyage.

    The Boy Tar

  • Gien I was you, I wadna tell fowk any sic nonsense as yon; I wad tell them 'at ilk ane' at disna dee his wark i 'the warl', an 'dee 't the richt gait, 's no the worth o' a minnin, no to say a whaul, for ilk ane o 'thae wee craturs dis the wull o' him 'at made' im wi 'ilka whisk o' his bit tailie, fa'in 'in wi' a 'the jabble o' the jaws again 'the rocks, for it's a' ae thing -- an 'a' to haud the muckle sea clean.

    Sir Gibbie

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Comments

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  • n., A slight agitated movement of water or other liquid; a splashing or dashing in small waves or ripples. v. 1) to jabber; 2a) to shake or mix up together; shake up or agitate (a liquid); cause to splash. 2b) to splash, plash, dash in small waves or ripples.

    I think 2b is positively poetic. :-)

    October 21, 2008