Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Someone who studies lepidoptery; someone who studies butterflies and moths.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who studies the Lepidoptera.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who is versed or engaged in the scientific study of Lepidoptera.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an entomologist who specializes in the collection and study of butterflies and moths

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • If a birdwatcher can have a 'big year,' why not a lepidopterist?.

    Butterfly Quest

  • He is Robert Michael Pyle, lepidopterist, naturalist, conservationist and writer who knows the taxonomy and biogeographical distribution of the nation 's pale ales and lagers as well as he knows North America' s butterfly fauna.

    Butterfly Quest

  • But there was one subject around which our different lives came together and found deep connection: the author and lepidopterist Vladimir Nabokov.

    Tamsin Smith: Nabokov's Other Gift

  • In an extract from his new book The Butterfly Isles: A Summer in Search of Our Emperors and Admirals, Patrick Barkham goes on the trail of one of Britain's most elusive butterflies• Audio slideshow: the love of butterflies• How I became a lepidopterist

    My search for the purple emperor butterfly

  • Is someone who studies butterflies and moths called an entomologist, a lepidopterist or an ornithologist?

    The Friday Brain-teaser from Credo Reference

  • I was at the butterfly exhibit yesterday at the Natural History Museum (a highlight of my cultural life in NYC) and the curators included some information about Nabokov who, as you probably already know, was an impassioned lepidopterist who combined trekking and writing.

    Selling pages from a writer’s notebook as a painter would his sketches

  • If you're forewarned about the only ill-advised and mildly amusing sexual simile in the book - "Like a lepidopterist mounting a tough-skinned insect with a too blunt pin he screwed himself into her" – then there's nothing else risible to fear, which for a novel with penetration on almost every page is an achievement.

    The Shape of Her by Rowan Somerfield

  • Someone taught the few youngsters in our crowd coconut painting, and a long-time Cuban refugee lepidopterist taught a minicourse for ages eight to twelve at the community college.

    Ann Beattie's 'The Rock': Narrative Magazine's Friday Feature

  • Now that I shared my obsession with you, I hope the lepidopterist among you will find it in your heart to share yours with me.

    Dora Levy Mossanen: The Wonder of Exotic Creatures

  • Similarly opposed are their contrasting voices – bitter, sadistic Harriet, a reluctant mother and obsessive lepidopterist, and the deceptively rambling, maternal but mother-to-none Maddie.

    First novels

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  • Should I abandon my art, choose another line of achievement, take up chess seriously, or become, say, a lepidopterist, or spend a dozen years as an obscure scholar making a Russian translation of Paradise Lost that would cause hacks to shy and asses to kick?
    --Vladimir Nabokov, 1974, Look at the Harlequins! p. 97

    June 13, 2009