Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A small evergreen tree (Eriobotrya japonica) native to China and Japan, having fragrant white flowers and pear-shaped yellow fruit with large seeds.
  • n. The edible fruit of this plant.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The Eriobotrya japonica tree.
  • n. The fruit of this tree. It is as large as a small plum, but grows in clusters, and contains four or five large seeds.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The fruit of the Japanese medlar (Photinia Japonica). It is as large as a small plum, but grows in clusters, and contains four or five large seeds. Also, the tree itself.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An evergreen shrub or tree, Photinia (Eryobotrya) Japonica, native in China and Japan, and commonly introduced in warm temperate climates.
  • n. The fruit of this tree. Also called biwa, lukwati, pipa, and Japanese medlar.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. yellow olive-sized semitropical fruit with a large free stone and relatively little flesh; used for jellies
  • n. evergreen tree of warm regions having fuzzy yellow olive-sized fruit with a large free stone; native to China and Japan

Etymologies

Chinese (Cantonese) lo kwat : lo, kind of tree + kwêt, an orange.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Chinese Cantonese trad. 蘆橘, simpl. 芦橘 (pinyin: lou4 gwat1) (older word) Related to kumquat – same second character. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • Citation on impluvium.

    January 2, 2012

  • A small evergreen tree native to China and Japan, cultivated as an ornamental and for its yellow, plumlike fruit; or the fruit itself. Also called Japanese plum.

    August 22, 2007