Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as maundy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The English word "maundy" is derived from the Latin word mandatum, which is the Vulgate's translation of Jesus 'words in John 13: 34: "A new commandment I give unto you, that you love one another."

    ABP News

  • "Maundy" comes from the word "mandatum," the "new commandment" to love one another that Jesus made at the Last Supper, as recorded in the Bible's John 13:34.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • Maundy Thursday takes its name from the Latin word "mandatum," the root of the English word mandate, according to the Catholic Encyclopedia.

    BangorDailyNews.com - News

  • The word maundy comes from the Latin word mandatum (commandment) which is the first word of the Gospel acclamation:

    ProLifeBlogs

  • Maundy is a very English corruption, as only the English can corrupt, of the Latin word mandatum.

    trinityboy Diary Entry

  • Pope John Paul II had tried to strengthen Catholic identity on campus, partly by requiring a "mandatum" from U.S.

    Pope: Catholic colleges should line up with doctrine

  • In 1990, Pope John Paul II issued Ex Corde Ecclesiae, an encyclical whose provisions included a requirement that theologians teaching at Catholic schools receive a stamp of approval from the church (a "mandatum"), and that the campus environment should be supportive of a Catholic way of life.

    Catholicism, Inc.

  • A further intellectual chill was felt in Catholic higher education when the Vatican declared that all Catholic theologians must sign a "mandatum" declaring their readiness to uphold the magisterium, or "teaching authority," of the pope.

    Beloved and Brave

  • Here, we pick up upon the Mass of Maundy or Holy Thursday, the Mass of the Lord's Supper, where the mandatum (the washing of the feet) also takes place.

    Compendium of the 1955 Holy Week Revisions of Pius XII: Part 3 - The Mass of Holy Thursday and the Mandatum

  • These included the washing of the apostles 'feet (ad mandatum), Easter itself, the Feast of the Ascension of Christ, the Assumption of the Virgin, and sometimes the dedication of the Church and the receiving of officials and royalty.

    Sensual Encounters: Monastic Women and Spirituality in Medieval Germany

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