Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. See standing stone.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A single tall standing stone as a monument, especially of prehistoric times.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A large stone set upright in olden times as a memorial or monument. Many, of unknown date, are found in Brittany and throughout Northern Europe.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In archaeology, one of a class of monumental stones of greater or less antiquity, found in various parts of Europe, also in Africa and in regions of Asia, especially in the Khassian hills.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a tall upright megalith; found primarily in England and northern France

Etymologies

French, from Breton : men, stone (from Middle Breton) + hir, long (from Middle Breton).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Breton maen-hir, from maen ("stone") + hir ("tall") ( = Welsh maen hir, Cornish mênhere). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • She was eliminated after spelling the word menhir wrong.

    Latest News - UPI.com

  • Lying also prostrate on the ground, by the side of it, is a smaller menhir, which is, however, above 30 feet long.

    Brittany & Its Byways

  • Moreover, in the departments of Aveyron, Tarn, and Hérault have been found what are known as menhir-statues, upright pillars of stone roughly shaped into human semblance at the top; they are of two types, the one clearly female and the other with no breasts, but always with a collar or baldric.

    Rough Stone Monuments and Their Builders

  • The best known of these types are as follows: Firstly, the menhir, which is

    Rough Stone Monuments and Their Builders

  • Aishwarya Pastapur, 13, from Springfield, Ill., who loved to pump her arm and exclaim "Yes!" after getting a word correct, finished third after flubbing "menhir", a type of monolith.

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  • Thirteen-year-old Aishwarya Pastapur of Springfield, Ill., who loved to pump her arm and exclaim "Yes!" after getting a word correct, finished third after flubbing "menhir", a type of stone monolith.

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  • "Yes!" after getting a word correct, finished third after flubbing "menhir", a type of monolith.

    Home - BostonHerald.com

  • Aishwarya Pastapur, 13, from Springfield, Ill., finished third after misspelling "menhir," a type of monolith.

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  • "Yes!" after getting a word correct, finished third after flubbing "menhir," a type of monolith.

    Taipei Times

  • "menhir," supposed to be the solitary survivor of a large group of these huge stones, stood near the village school some years ago.

    Northumberland Yesterday and To-day

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Comments

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  • "'There's a stone there to mark the border, maybe you'll know; it looks the sort of stone to last awhile.' He glanced at me, questioning.... I did know it; a huge menhir, some ten feet tall."
    —Diana Gabaldon, Voyager (NY: Dell, 1994), 555

    January 17, 2010