Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A professed method of healing which rests upon the suppositions that all diseased states of the body are due to abnormal conditions of the mind, and that the latter (and thus the former) can be cured by the direct action of the mind of the healer upon the mind of the patient.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • James also cites the "mind-cure movement" of Mary Baker Eddy, for whom "evil is simply a lie, and any one who mentions it is a liar" (V, 107).

    William James

  • In his review of my Werner Erhard (NYR, April 5), Jonathan Lieberson patronizingly alleges that William James was "naïve" in his sympathetic discussion of the "mind-cure" movements of the nineteenth century; and that I have now "fallen" for Werner Erhard.

    Deep-Est

  • "Aw, I don't know much about burglaries, -- never had one in the family; but I think a lot about mind-cure and all that sort of thing."

    Flint His Faults, His Friendships and His Fortunes

  • "Do you believe in the mind-cure?" asked Miss Wabash, who had caught the phrase across the table.

    Flint His Faults, His Friendships and His Fortunes

  • "I have noticed," said Winifred to Captain Blathwayt, "that there are two subjects which will make even dull people lively, -- burglaries and mind-cure."

    Flint His Faults, His Friendships and His Fortunes

  • Kansas, and while there they had heard of a lady in Princeton who was having remarkable success with mind-cure, as they called it.

    The Right Knock A Story

  • Grasping only the surface meaning of this grand truth, we recognize and admire the mental power which produces cures, hence it is frequently called mind-cure, because, through the agency of mind, the cure is wrought, as we say, water-cure or sun-cure for the same reason; but as we proceed in the study, we will go beyond an intellectual to a spiritual perception of what is meant by

    The Right Knock A Story

  • Scientists throw down their barriers and join the general mind-cure movement, and the two branches of Quimbyism meet, then half of Mrs. Eddy's life-work is lost.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol 31, No 2, June 1908

  • Mrs. Eddy's theology is, of course, a mere derivative of her system of therapeutics, an attempt to base her peculiar variety of mind-cure upon

    McClure's Magazine, Vol 31, No 2, June 1908

  • I have been paying ten or eleven visits to a mind-cure doctress, a sterling creature, resembling the Venus of Medicine, Mrs Lydia E. Pinkham, made solid and veracious-looking.

    Familiar Letters of William James I

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • It's success is all in your head.

    December 22, 2011