Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of ostrich.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Well all I can say to these ostriches is "If you live here of course it should bother you."

    Reflections on Living with Violence in Mexico

  • This form of behaviour is sort of similar to the creching present in ostriches, and the parental behaviour of male cassowaries, emus and kiwis.

    Archive 2006-06-01

  • Once, say they, the ostriches were a beautiful and glorious race of birds, with large, strong wings.

    Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen

  • Once, they say, the ostriches were a beautiful, glorious race of birds, with strong large wings; and one evening the larger birds of the forest said to the ostrich, "Brother, shall we fly to-morrow, _God willing_, to the river to drink?"

    What the Moon Saw: and Other Tales

  • They had nothing to eat excepting what they could catch, such as ostriches, deer, armadilloes, etc., and their only fuel was the dry stalks of a small plant, somewhat resembling an aloe.

    Journal of researches into the geology and natural history of the various countries visited by H.M.S. Beagle

  • (See on [1150] Job 30: 29). owls -- rather, "ostriches," which give a shrill and long-drawn, sigh-like cry, especially at night.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • SYDNEY: Large, flightless birds such as ostriches and emus, originated in the northern hemisphere, according to an Australian study that suggests they became grounded after dinosaurs went extinct.

    COSMOS magazine - The science of everything

  • The grasslands surrounding the pans support a moderate bird fauna with species such as ostriches, secretary birds (Sagittarius serpentarius), kori bustards (Ardeotis kori), korhaans (Eupodotis spp.), sandgrouse (Pterocles spp.) and francolin (Francolinus spp.) being common.

    Zambezian halophytics

  • That is eerily similar to reason #7 why I’m not allowed inside grocery stores unaccompanied, except replace the word "ostriches" with "BTK victims" and add the word "meat" to the end.

    FEATURETTE FOR THE NEW JAMES BOND FILM

  • (Notable exceptions are large flightless birds such as ostriches and emus.

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Comments

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  • There's a tape of me as a 2 year old, talking about the "ah-swidge" at the petting zoo. I love that pronunciation, even now.

    December 5, 2008

  • 'Strewth!

    December 5, 2008

  • Is that why no-one likes the brown ones?

    December 5, 2008

  • That would be rather silly. I can think of much better things to do with Smarties.

    April 20, 2008

  • Re: ringing Joyce
    Wikipedia cites it as a mondegreen sung by the main character in the Australian mockumentary Kenny (2006). Kenny also has such fascinating sayings as: "This is the busiest time of year, this is a crazy time, it just goes bonkers. It's as silly as a bum full of smarties".

    April 20, 2008

  • Frin, that Joyce version sounds a bit sus, if you ask me.

    I, myself, am far too young to have known the non-PC version, or even to know it ever existed. I was ready with an indignant response when I read the first comment :D

    April 20, 2008

  • I'm just old enough to have learned the un-PC original version of the Australian anthem. And to have sung God Save the Queen as well as the national anthem. (God Save the Queen was phased out when I was infants school, I think).

    By the way, if not sung at dirge-like pace, the tune for God Save the Queen (My country ’tis of thee) reveals its origins as a sprightly Elizabethan galliard.

    April 20, 2008

  • I never heard "Australian sons..." and always thought it was "Australians all."

    April 20, 2008

  • And apparently there's another variant:
    "Australians all let us call Joyce
    For she is young and free…"

    April 19, 2008

  • In primary school, my friends and I sang "Australians all eat ostriches."

    We knew what it was really, but it was fun.

    April 19, 2008

  • I mean, I had always wondered about the ostriches – they're not native to Australia after all – but I simply concluded that emus wouldn't have scanned so well.

    Oh, and I think nowadays we're meant to sing "Australians all…"

    April 19, 2008

  • As in "Australian sons and ostriches"

    The Australian anthem actually begins:
    "Australian sons let us rejoice."
    But I didn't realise this until sixth class.

    April 19, 2008