Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A vain, talkative person.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A strutting supercilious person; a coxcomb, dandy, fop.
  • n. A parrot
  • n. A green woodpecker, Picus viridis.
  • n. A wooden parrot, or similar object, stuck on a pole as a target to be shot at.
  • n. A heraldic (or other) representation of a parrot.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.
  • n. The green woodpecker.
  • n. A parrot.
  • n. A target in the form of a parrot.
  • n. A trifling, chattering, fop or coxcomb.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A parrot.
  • n. A woodpecker; especially, the green wood-pecker of Europe, Gecinus viridis.
  • n. The figure of a parrot or other bird used as a mark for archery or firearms.
  • n. In heraldry, a parrot used as a bearing: always, unless otherwise mentioned in the blazon, represented green, with red legs and beak.
  • n. A coxcomb; a fop.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an archaic term for a parrot
  • n. a vain and talkative person (chatters like a parrot)

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, parrot, from Old French papegai, from Spanish papagayo or Old Provençal papagai, both from Arabic babġā', babaġā', from Persian babbaghā.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old French papegai ("a parrot"), either from Ancient Greek παπαγός (papagos) or from Spanish papagayo (also Modern Spanish), from Arabic babagha'.

Examples

  • _Item_, a pair of hose of popinjay green (they be well called popinjay) of thirty shillings.

    Joyce Morrell's Harvest The Annals of Selwick Hall

  • Hotspur's picture of this "popinjay" with pouncet-box in hand, and

    The Man Shakespeare

  • Might Hooper and Seidler have considered making Logue do the "popinjay" speech by

    The Guardian World News

  • Leftists accused him of "betrayal," it continued, and quoted one who had described him as a "drink-soaked former Trotskyist popinjay".

    Christopher Hitchens: He died too young, with too much left to say | Nick Cohen

  • A serious writer may be a hawk or a buzzard or even a popinjay, but a solemn writer is always a bloody owl.

    live-love-create

  • Defending the absurd notion that the windbaggery of Mr. Galloway is somehow a threat to our national security, a spokesperson for the virginal Jason Kenney, Alykhan Velshi, referred to Gorgeous George as "someone who has provided financial support to Hamas, a banned terrorist organization in Canada, and someone who is, in a sense, a popinjay for those Taliban fighters who are trying to kill Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan."

    Archive 2009-03-01

  • In 2005, George Galloway, UK Respect MP for Bethnal Green and Bow, and ardent "pro-life" campaigner, famously referred to his arch-nemesis, Christopher Hitchens, as a "drink-soaked former Trotskyist popinjay."

    Archive 2009-03-01

  • Words come to mind that I can't print in their entirety, that the tribunal is full of petty popinjay chickens**ts.

    On Public Universities And Guns

  • That said, I cannot imagine she got the run around from popinjay Hitchens.

    Tony Blair: The Next Labour Prime Minister?

  • "I cannot imagine she got the run around from popinjay Hitchens"

    Tony Blair: The Next Labour Prime Minister?

Comments

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  • or fop

    December 5, 2008

  • Also a nickname for the Green Woodpecker. See also: yaffle.

    December 7, 2007

  • NOUN: A vain, talkative person.

    ETYMOLOGY: Middle English, parrot, from Old French papegai, from Spanish papagayo or Old Provençal papagai, both from Arabic bab’, baba’, from Persian babbagh.

    July 18, 2007