Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Septicemia caused by pyogenic microorganisms in the blood, often resulting in the formation of multiple abscesses.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of pyaemia.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See pyæmia.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In pathology, a febrile disease caused by the absorption of pus, or certain of its constituents, or of its bacteria, with the formation of metastatic abscesses.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. septicemia caused by pus-forming bacteria being released from an abscess

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Three of the ladies made it through the first ward, with its cases of scrofula, scabies, eczema, defluxions, and stinking pyemia, before deciding that their charitable inclinations could be entirely satisfied by a donation to L'Hôpital, and fleeing back to the dispensary to shed the rough hopsacking gowns with which we had been furnished.

    Dragonfly in Amber

  • Rheumatism may be thought of, with respect to arthritic inflammation caused thereby, as a sort of pyemia.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • This condition is well defined by Bollinger as quoted by Hoare, [1] when he calls it a purulent omphalophlebitis due to local infection of the umbilicus and umbilical vessels, by pyogenic organisms, causing a metastatic pyemia.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • Fayrer operated on 28 patients with 22 recoveries and six deaths, one from shock and five from pyemia The same surgeon collected 193 cases, and found the general mortality to be 18 per cent.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • He also quotes a case of pyemia in a boy of seven, whose temperature rose to 107. 6o F.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • He also quotes a case of pyemia in a boy of seven, whose temperature rose to 107.6 degrees F.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • Fayrer operated on 28 patients with 22 recoveries and six deaths, one from shock and five from pyemia The same surgeon collected

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • The Crows and Creeks are usually delivered prone upon the stomach, and the placenta is rapidly expelled, either in the same posture or while standing; in rare cases it is delayed, and then it is allowed to remain until it decomposes, and, remarkable to say, pyemia rarely follows, probably on account of the naturally strong constitution of the race.

    Labor Among Primitive Peoples

  • The ball, he said, had passed on and out, and he went into particulars with me, while I wondered if Kendall knew, as I did, what parts of the body the pleura, the thorax, the clavicle and the pyemia were.

    The Cavalier

  • If it is due to stable miasma, uremic poisoning, pyemia, influenza, rheumatism, toxic agents, etc., they should receive prompt attention for their removal or mitigation.

    Special Report on Diseases of the Horse

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  • "Mother Hildegarde was a shrewd judge of human nature. Three of the ladies made it through the first ward, with its cases of scrofula, scabies, eczema, defluxions, and stinking pyemia, before deciding that their charitable inclinations could be entirely satisfied by a donation to L'Hôpital, and fleeing back to the dispensary to shed the rough hopsacking gowns with which we had been furnished."
    —Diana Gabaldon, Dragonfly in Amber (NY: Delacorte Press, 1991), 221–222

    December 31, 2009