Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An unruly, rude young person.
  • n. A rakish person.
  • v. To act like a rantipole.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Wild; roving; rakish.
  • n. A wild, romping young person.
  • intransitive v. To act like a rantipole.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Wild; roving; rakish.
  • n. A rude, romping boy or girl; a wild, reckless fellow.
  • To run about wildly.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • She has given up all those that I used to call her rantipole acquaintance.

    Belinda

  • Nicholas Woodeson savours every line of the rantipole, self-regarding Mr Prince who proudly announces "I am the American King Lear" and Keeley Hawes elegantly makes a case for Ben's reproving but desolate wife.

    Review | Theatre | Rocket to the Moon | Venue | Michael Billington

  • And now, my dear Severn, when you have read this rantipole page, walk soberly into your bed-room, put on your night cap, heave a sigh, squeeze a tear out if you can, and lament over my unfortunate, sad, lost state; while I roar with laughter at all wise fellows like yourself.

    New Letters from Charles Brown to Joseph Severn

  • 'Well, sir, well,' said the old gentleman, now very much piqued, 'I can't but say I feel some concern for my old friend, to have his money doused about at such a rantipole rate.

    Camilla

  • He was one evening at the house of his friend Burke, when he was beset by a tenth muse, an Irish widow and authoress, just arrived from Ireland, full of brogue and blunders, and poetic fire and rantipole gentility.

    The Life of Oliver Goldsmith

  • This rantipole hero had for some time singled out the blooming

    The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon

  • Railings and ravings rantipole we hold are reprehensible,

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 100, February 28, 1891

  • Page 132 some rare snatched fleeting moments of rantipole laughter, and at the last a decent bed to die in.

    The Cream of the Jest: A Comedy of Evasions

  • This rantipole hero had for some time singled out the blooming Katrina for the object of his uncouth gallantries, and though his amorous toyings were something like the gentle caresses and endearments of a bear, yet it was whispered that she did not altogether discourage his hopes.

    The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

  • "Hymns, ballets, or rantipole rubbish; the Rogue's March or the cherubim's warble -- 'tis all the same to me if 'tis good harmony, and well put out."

    The Mayor of Casterbridge

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Comments

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  • This rantipole hero had for some time singled out the blooming Katrina for the object of his uncouth gallantries, and though his amorous toyings were something like the gentle caresses and endearments of a bear, yet it was whispered that she did not altogether discourage his hopes. Washington Irving, "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"

    October 30, 2009

  • "Riding St. George" is basically woman-on-top sex... supposedly "the way to get a bishop," saith the Dictionary.
    0_o

    I guess the way the rantipole's made nowadays must be in the eye of the beholder.

    September 12, 2008

  • They don't make rantipoles the way they used to.

    September 12, 2008

  • I get the impression that romping used to be a whole lot more fun than it is nowadays.

    September 12, 2008

  • "A rude romping boy or girl; also a gadabout dissipated woman. To ride rantipole; the same as riding St. George. See St. George." (1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue)

    September 12, 2008

  • (Noun) A wild, romping young person. (Adj) Wild; roving; rakish.

    October 3, 2007