Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One, such as a cutting tool, that skives.
  • n. A soft thin leather split off the outside of sheepskin and used for bookbinding.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who uses a skive (or skives).
  • n. A slacker.
  • n. A skewer.
  • n. An inferior quality of leather, made of split sheepskin, tanned by immersion in sumac, and dyed, formerly used for hat linings, pocketbooks, bookbinding, etc.
  • n. The cutting tool or machine used in splitting leather or skins.
  • v. To skewer, impale.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An inferior quality of leather, made of split sheepskin, tanned by immersion in sumac, and dyed. It is used for hat linings, pocketbooks, bookbinding, etc.
  • n. The cutting tool or machine used in splitting leather or skins, as sheepskins.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To skewer; impale.
  • To scatter; disperse; fly apart or in various directions, as a flock of birds.
  • n. Same as skiving-knife.
  • n. Leather split by the skiving-knife; a thin leather made of the grained side of split sheepskin tanned in sumac. It is used for cheap bindings for books, the lining of hats, pocket-books, etc. Compare skiving.
  • n. In shoe manufacturing, a machine for cutting counters for shoes and for making rands; a leather-skiving machine.
  • n. An old form of dirk.
  • n. A skewer.

Etymologies

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Examples

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Comments

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  • Does this have anything to do with aebleskivers?

    April 26, 2011

  • I use this as a synonmym for "shirker," which is apparently not a terribly common usage. Huh.

    December 10, 2006