Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. Chiefly British To latch (a door or window): "[The] window is snibbed on the inner side” ( Arthur Conan Doyle).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A latch or fastening for a door, window etc.
  • n. A reprimand; a snub.
  • v. To latch (a door, window etc.).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A reprimand; a snub.
  • transitive v. To check; to sneap; to sneb.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To check; reprimand; snub; sneap or sneb.
  • In lumbering, to allow one's self to be carried away (ostensibly by accident) on the first portion of a jam that moves; ride away from work under the guise of being accidentally carried off in river-driving.
  • n. A reproof; a reprimand; a snub.

Etymologies

Origin unknown.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Origin uncertain. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • He pressed the snib to unlatch the lid of the case.

    Boiling a Frog

  • He heard the lock snib before she turned and surveyed him, then, head rising, crossed the room to him.

    The Perfect Lover

  • She was no curtaintwitcher, like many round here, and despite the torrential flow of other people's business through what was not just her home but her business, she had never succumbed to the temptation to poke her snib in where it hadn't been invited.

    Quite Ugly One Morning

  • Anyway, if Kemp came to the door he'd notice the snib was off ...

    Strip Jack

  • Gently, Rebus turned the snib and locked it at the off position.

    Strip Jack

  • Well, perhaps not worldly-wise, not wise enough to know how snib locks and human minds worked, but wise in other ways.

    Strip Jack

  • Monica closed it gently down, and fastened the snib.

    Beyond the City

  • It was the same as all the others: a sash window with a snib locking the upper to the lower frame.

    Tied Up in Tinsel

  • The door was aff the snib; an ', keep me, when I lookit in, here's Sandy wi' an Oddfella's kilt an 'a bushbie on, an' his ilky-day's claes lyin 'in a pozel on the table.

    My Man Sandy

  • You would depart, of course, in the same fashion, and your ally would draw up the rope, untie it from the hook, shut the window, snib it on the inside, and get away in the way that he originally came.

    The Sign of Four

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  • "1. In lumbering, to allow one's self to be carried away (ostensibly by accident) on the first portion of a jam that moves; ride away from work under the guise of being accidentally carried off in river-driving." --Cent. Dict.

    September 1, 2011