Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Capable of being spent.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • That may be spent; proper to be used for current needs: as, spendable income.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. (used of funds) remaining after taxes

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A 1996 study by Linda Ginnarelli and Eugene Steuerle at the Urban Institute examined the changes in what we are calling spendable income for different hypothetical families currently on welfare if they were to become employed in a minimum-wage job.3 The tax implications include actual taxes paid, lost welfare benefits, and any expenditure necessary for the job such as commuting expenditures for both part-time and full-time employment.

    RETURN TO PROSPERITY

  • As far as being able to spend some of the income from these gains, most of the interest and dividend payments are not in spendable form but locked in tax-sheltered investments -- only 20 per cent of U.S. households actually receive spendable dividends.

    Investment Forum—1996

  • "When you get into this type of economy, where the consumer does not have the kind of spendable income that they had previously, they tend to do more things as a family," Neil Friedman, president of Mattel brands, said in a telephone interview.

    Board Games Benefit from Bad Economy

  • Yet now that they, the socialists, have won, they have to resort to the IRS to run and maintain the system which will lead to more invasive control of the individual Americans 'spendable' income toward mandated insurance and less toward individual investing in retirement systems, stocks, and general personal disposable income.

    Propeller Most Popular Stories

  • Starting with the year ending in mid-2011, Ross said, new accounting standards will require more precise definitions of "spendable" amounts within fund balances.

    statesmanjournal.com - Top Stories

  • Academic research shows that small increases in paychecks are viewed as "spendable" income, while larger lump sums are viewed as wealth to be saved.

    Kentucky.com: Homepage

  • Academic research shows that small increases in paychecks are viewed as "spendable" income, whereas larger lump sums are viewed as wealth to be saved.

    STLtoday.com Top News Headlines

  • The sole difference is perception ... aka "spendable" dollars in the end.

    TradingMarkets

  • Less demand for housing means an even more depressed housing market - which, in turn, leads to less spendable income for everybody.

    Richard (RJ) Eskow: Reality Checks: 10 Economic Pointers For the State of the Union (And the GOP Response)

  • They distribute shares rather than cash, so investors don't get spendable income, but pay taxes only when they sell.

    Oil Partnerships Keep Rolling

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