Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To breathe: "And from that one intake of fire/All creatures still warmly suspire” ( Robert Frost).
  • intransitive v. To sigh.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To breathe.
  • v. To exhale.
  • v. To sigh.
  • n. A long, deep breath; a sigh.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A long, deep breath; a sigh.
  • intransitive v. To fetch a long, deep breath; to sigh; to breathe.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To fetch a long, deep breath: sigh.
  • To breathe.
  • To sigh or long for.
  • n. A deep breath; a sigh.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. heave or utter a sigh; breathe deeply and heavily
  • v. draw air into, and expel out of, the lungs

Etymologies

Middle English suspiren, to sigh, from Old French, from Latin suspīrāre : sub-, from below; see sub- + spīrāre, to breathe.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old French suspirer (Modern soupirer), from Latin. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • A living, breathing—well, breathing at least—vampire.

    March 25, 2009

  • -- Lovely! Buck Mulligan suspired amorously.
    Joyce, Ulysses, 9

    January 6, 2007