Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Archaic form of tunny. (a kind of fish)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The tunny.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as tunny.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I'm coming after you with both gunth blaything, thunny boy.

    unclebob Diary Entry

  • At one of the principal thunny fisheries near Catania, the fishermen have fixed upon poles, like English kites on a barn-door, _pour encourager les autres_, two immense sharks 'heads as trophies -- the jaws at full gape, exhibiting four sets of teeth as sharp as harrows, and as white and polished as ivory.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846

  • An "ancient mariner" told us, that full forty miles from Syracuse, a shark, which had been following him for a long time, thrust his head suddenly out of the water, and made a snap at him; and if the boat had not been a _thunny_ boat, high in the sides, there is no saying how much of him might have been extant!

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846

  • And finally, that blue _æquor_, as it now deserves to be termed, studded over with thunny boats and coasting craft with the haze latine sail, that we should be sorry to trust in British hands, is walled in by cliffs so bold, so rugged, and standing out so beautifully in relief, that for a moment we cannot choose but envy the citizen of

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 56, No. 345, July, 1844

  • As to breakfast -- the meal which is associated with that particular hour of the four-and-twenty to all well regulated _minds_ and _stomachs_ -- it consists here of thin _veneers_ of old mahogany-coloured thunny, varnished with oil, and relieved by an incongruous abomination of capers and olives.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 56, No. 345, July, 1844

  • The drum tells you when the thunny is at a discount, and _fire-works_ are let off at

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 56, No. 345, July, 1844

  • In the bay of _Melazzo_ are taken by far the largest supplies of thunny in the whole Mediterranean.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 56, No. 345, July, 1844

  • _Mediterranean_; and as to _thunny_, one surfeit would put it out of the bill of fare for life.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 56, No. 345, July, 1844

  • But the cookery, and the gravy into which they are wont to put wine and vinegar, and shred thunny fish, and the sauce in which the fish chalbith is not swimming, and the herring, and the essence of assafœtida, and spiced salt, are forbidden; but every use of them is not strictly forbidden.

    Hebrew Literature

  • These things are allowed for eating — milk which an idolater milked, and an Israelite saw, and honey and honeycomb, even if they are dropping, as they do not contain the effect of liquor, (450) and gravy into which they are not wont to put wine and vinegar, and shred thunny fish, and sauce in which there is the fish chalbith, and the leaf of the assafœtida, and olives crushed into round cakes.

    Hebrew Literature

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.